Commands by zlemini (45)

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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Reduce PDF Filesize

diff two svn repos ignoring spaces,tabs and svnfiles

save man-page as pdf

Install Linux Kernel Headers on Debian-based systems
Install the Linux kernel headers for currently running kernel version on Debian-based systems via apt-get

Separates each frame of a animated gif file to a counted file, then appends the frames together into one sheet file. Useful for making sprite sheets for games.
requires imagemagick

Write a shell script that removes files that contain a string
Deletes files in the current directory or its subdirectories that match "regexp" but handle directories, newlines, spaces, and other funky characters better than the original #13315. Also uses grep's "-q" to be quiet and quit at the first match, making this much faster. No need for awk either.

sudo for entire line (including pipes and redirects)
USAGE: $ sudor your command This command uses a dirty hack with history, so be sure you not turned it off. WARNING! This command behavior differ from other commands. It more like text macro, so you shouldn't use it in subshells, non-interactive sessions, other functions/aliases and so on. You shouldn't pipe into sudor (any string that prefixes sudor will be removed), but if you really want, use this commands: $ proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; pre_sudor_command="`history 1 | cut -d ' ' -f 5- | sed -r -e 's/sudor.*$//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`"; if [ -n "${pre_sudor_command/ */}" ] ; then eval "${pre_sudor_command%| *}" | sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; else sudo sh -c "$sudor_command" ;fi ;}; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "

List your largest installed packages (on Debian/Ubuntu)
dpigs is in the package debian-goodies (debian/ubuntu)

ls -hog --> a more compact ls -l
I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog'


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