Commands by zluyuer (15)

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Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Remove Thumbs.db files from folders
An alternative which uses the advanced zsh globbing (pattern matching)

How to trim a video using ffmpeg
Will trim the video to 4 seconds starting from the beginning. The -vcodec , -acodec options are required so that ffmpeg knows in what video/audio format you want for the new video.

Rename files in batch

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Query ip pools based on successive netnames via whois
Useful if you f.i. want to block/allow all connections from a certain provider which uses successive netnames for his ip blocks. In this example I used the german Deutsche Telekom which has DTAG-DIAL followed by a number as netname for the dial in pools. There are - as always ;) - different ways to do this. If you have seq available you can use $ net=DTAG-DIAL ; for i in `seq 1 30`; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done or without seq you can use bash brace expansion $ net=DTAG-DIAL ; for i in {1..30}; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; done or if you like while better than for use something like $ net=DTAG-DIAL ; i=1 ; while true ; do whois -h whois.ripe.net $net$i | grep '^inetnum:' | sed "s;^.*:;$net$i;" ; test $i = 30 && break ; i=$(expr $i + 1) ; done and so on.

Display a list of RPMs installed on a particular date
Find out which RPMs were installed on a particular date. These would (naturally) include update RPMs. This example shows searching for "Thu 05 Mar" (with grep). Alternatively, pipe it to less so you can search inside less (with less's neat text highlighting of the search term): rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | less # (this example) search term: Thu 05 Mar

flush memcached via netcat

Encrypted chat with netcat and openssl (one-liner)
client$ while true; do read -n30 ui; echo $ui |openssl enc -aes-256-ctr -a -k PaSSw ; done | nc localhost 8877 | while read so; do decoded_so=`echo "$so"| openssl enc -d -a -aes-256-ctr -k PaSSw`; echo -e "Incoming: $decoded_so"; done This will establish a simple encrypted chat with AES-256-CTR using netcat and openssl only. More info here https://nixaid.com/encrypted-chat-with-netcat/

easily find megabyte eating files or directories


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