Commands by zwettler (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Keep one instance of an irc chat client in a screen session
This command attempts to attach to existing irssi session, if one exists, otherwise creates one. I use "irc" because I use different irc clients depending on what system I am working on. Consistency is queen.

draw line separator (using knoppix5 idea)

SMTP Analysis
This works just as well for SMTP. You could run this on your mail server to watch e-mail senders and recipients: tcpdump -l -s0 -w - tcp dst port 25 | strings | grep -i 'MAIL FROM\|RCPT TO'

Do a command but skip recording it in the bash command history
Note the extra space before the command (I had to put it as an underscore since the website eats up preceding spaces). That's all it takes. Now if you check your history with "$ history", it wont show up.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Convert all files *.mp4 to *.mpeg using ffmpeg (Windows Cmd line)
Note: %~nI expands %I to a file name only (cf. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb490909.aspx)

Insert the last argument of the previous command
for example if you did a: $ ls -la /bin/ls then $ ls !$ is equivalent to doing a $ ls /bin/ls

get detailed info about a lan card on HP-UX 11.31

Search gpg keys from commandline

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).


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