Commands by zyxh (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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subtraction between lines

Create a 5 MB blank file via a seek hole
Similar to the original, but is much faster since it only needs to write the last byte as zero. A diff on testfile and testfile.seek will return that they are the same.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Quick case-insenstive partial filename search
This is a simple command, but extremely useful. It's a quick way to search the file names in the current directory for a substring. Normally people use "ls *term*" but that requires the stars and is not case insensitive. Color (for both ls and grep) is an added bonus.

Download all manuals RedHat 7 (CentOS/Fedora) with one command in Linux

count match string lines from file(s)

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Yet Another Rename (bash function)
Implementation of `rename` for systems on which I don't have access to it.

Rename .JPG to .jpg recursively
This command is useful for renaming a clipart, pic gallery or your photo collection. It will only change the big caps to small ones (on the extension).

combine `mkdir foo && cd foo` into a single function `mcd foo`
I find that I create a directory and then cd into that directory quite often. I found this little function on the internets somewhere and thought I'd share it. Just copy-paste it into you ~/.bash_profile and then `source ~/.bash_profile`.


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