Commands matching nmap (84)

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Create a listing of all possible permissions and their octal representation.

Create a bunch of dummy text files
Using the 'time' command, running this with 'tr' took 28 seconds (and change) each time but using base64 only took 8 seconds (and change). If the file doesn't have to be viewable, pulling straight from urandom with head only took 6 seconds (and change)

To get the CPU temperature continuously on the desktop
No need for a colon, and one less semicolon too. Also untested.

Get all IPs via ifconfig
works on Linux and Solaris. I think it will work on nearly all *nix-es

Consolle based network interface monitor
ethstatus part of ethstatus package, is a consolle based monitor for network interfaces. Nicely display on screen a real time summary about bandwidth, speed and packets.

Get shellcode of the binary using objdump
Anyone can make the command smaller & easier? :)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get notified when a job you run in a terminal is done, using NotifyOSD
This is an alias you can add to your .bashrc file to get notified when a job you run in a terminal is done. example of use sleep 20; alert Source:http://www.webupd8.org/2010/07/get-notified-when-job-you-run-in.html

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Check if *hardware* is 32bit or 64bit
CPU flags: rm --> 16-bit processor (real mode) tm --> 32-bit processor (? mode) lm --> 64-bit processor (long mode)


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