Commands matching ssh (492)

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Update a tarball
This will update the tarball, adding files that have changed since the last update. This assumes that the tarball is in the same directory as the files being archived. N.B. This command can't be used on compressed tarballs. N.B. This will add the updated files to the tarball, so that the tarball will have two versions of each file. This will make the tarball larger, but doesn't have any other significant effect.

a fast way to repeat output a byte
I'm both a one-liner fan and a haskell learner

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Read and write to TCP or UDP sockets with common bash tools
Ever needed to test firewalls but didn't have netcat, telnet or even FTP? Enter /dev/tcp, your new best friend. /dev/tcp/(hostname)/(port) is a bash builtin that bash can use to open connections to TCP and UDP ports. This one-liner opens a connection on a port to a server and lets you read and write to it from the terminal. How it works: First, exec sets up a redirect for /dev/tcp/$server/$port to file descriptor 5. Then, as per some excellent feedback from @flatcap, we launch a redirect from file descriptor 5 to STDOUT and send that to the background (which is what causes the PID to be printed when the commands are run), and then redirect STDIN to file descriptor 5 with the second cat. Finally, when the second cat dies (the connection is closed), we clean up the file descriptor with 'exec 5>&-'. It can be used to test FTP, HTTP, NTP, or can connect to netcat listening on a port (makes for a simple chat client!) Replace /tcp/ with /udp/ to use UDP instead.

bash shortcut: !$ !^ !* !:3 !:h and !:t
When expanding, bash output the command, so don't be affraid if you type the command. Here is the details: First examples: $echo foo bar foobar barfoo First argument: $echo !$ echo barfoo barfoo (Note that typing echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo !$, bash substitute !$ with $:1) Last argument: $echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo !^ echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo barfoo foo bar foobar barfoo barfoo All the arguments: $echo !* echo foo bar foobar barfoo foo bar foobar barfoo The third argument: $echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo !:3 echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo foobar foo bar foobar barfoo foobar You may want to add {} for large numbers: echo !:{11} for example Now with path: $echo /usr/bin/foobar /usr/bin/foobar For the head: $echo !$:h echo /usr/bin /usr/bin And the tail: $echo !$:t echo foobar foobar You also may want to try !:h and !:t or !!3-4 for the third and the fourth (so !!:* == !!:1-$)

Create the authorization header required for a Twitter stream feed
This is the FOURTH in a set of five commands. Please see my other commands for the previous three steps. This command builds the authorization header required by Twitter. For this command to work, see my previous 3 commands (step1, step2 and step3) as they are required to build the environment variables used in this command. For more information on the authorization header, go to dev.twitter.com/apps, click on any of your apps (or create a new one) and then click on the "OAuth Tool" tab.

Find the package that installed a command

Switch to the previous branch used in git(1)
Very useful if you keep switching between the same two branches all the time.

execute a shell with netcat without -e
Shorter version with proper stderr redirection .

ls -qaltr # list directory in chronological order, most recent files at end of list
I find it very handy to be able to quickly see the most recently modified/created files in a directory. Note that the "q" option will reveal any files with non-printable characters in their filename.


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