Commands tagged Date manipulation (23)

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Map the slot of an I/O card to its PCI bus address
Recent hardware may or may not enumerate *both of* these values

Using a single sudo to run multiple && arguments
This will also work with bash instead of sh shell sudo bash -c 'apt update -y && apt upgrade -y'

Intercept, monitor and manipulate a TCP connection.
This will handle multiple incoming connections. Also, found sed works best with -u flag (unbuffered io). Easiest way I've found to get ncat is to install nmap.

list files recursively by size

Google's Text-To-Speech in command line
Improved google text-to-speech function. Allows to specify language, plays sound in terminal. Automatically removes downloaded file after successfully processing. Usage: $ say LANGUAGE TEXT Examples: $ say en "This is a test." $ say pl "To jest test"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

list block level layout

Content search.
Grep will read the contents of each file in PWD and will use the REs $1 $2 ... $n to match the contents. In case of match, grep will print the appropriate file, line number and the matching line. It's just easier to write $ ff word1 word2 word3 Instead of $ grep -rinE 'word1|word2|word3' .

Remove duplicate rows of an un-sorted file based on a single column
The command (above) will remove any duplicate rows based on the FIRST column of data in an un-sorted file. The '$1' represents a positional parameter. You can change both instances of '$1' in the command to remove duplicates based on a different column, for instance, the third: $ awk '{ if ($3 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$3]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt Or you can change it to '$0' to base the removal on the whole row: $ awk '{ if ($0 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$0]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt ** Note: I wouldn't use this on a MASSIVE file, unless you're RAM-rich ;) **

List all execs in $PATH, usefull for grepping the resulting list
##Dependancies: bash coreutils Many executables in $PATH have the keyword somewhere other than the beginning in their file names. The command is useful for exploring the executables in $PATH like this. $ find ${PATH//:/ } -executable -type f -printf "%f\n" |grep admin lpadmin time-admin network-admin svnadmin users-admin django-admin shares-admin services-admin


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