Commands tagged devices (5)

  • This command lists the names of your USB devices connected and what file in /dev they are using. It's pretty useful if you don't have an automount option in your desktop or you don't have any graphical enviroment. Show Sample Output


    2
    ls -la /dev/disk/by-id/usb-*
    casidiablo · 2009-11-25 16:02:06 0
  • Traditionally we rewind a tape using this syntaxis: mt -f /dev/rmt/0cbn rewind Redirecting the dispositive to nothing as shown above is faster. Less typing is always better.


    2
    < /dev/rmt/0cbn
    vlan7 · 2010-01-25 20:32:38 0
  • The above command assumes the lost data is on /dev/sda and you previously issued the following command to mount _another_ disk or partition (/dev/sdb1) on /recovery sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /recovery If you don't do this, the data could be overwrited! foremost is a very powerful carving tool. By default foremost recovers all known file types. If you want to reduce the amount of files that are recovered you can specify the file type you are looking for. Read the man page to know the available file types. i.e to recover JPEG pictures append to foremost the switch -tjpg


    2
    sudo foremost -i /dev/sda -o /recovery
    vlan7 · 2010-08-19 22:27:41 1
  • Necessary for fsck for example. The remount functionality follows the standard way how the mount command works with options from fstab. It means the mount command doesn't read fstab (or mtab) only when a device and dir are fully specified. After this call all old mount options are replaced and arbitrary stuff from fstab is ignored, except the loop= option which is internally generated and maintained by the mount command. It does not change device or mount point.


    2
    mount -o remount,ro /dev/foo /
    vlan7 · 2010-10-30 03:51:53 2
  • Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.


    1
    watch -n 0,2 lsusb
    kot9pko · 2016-03-11 20:00:48 65

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

split a file by a specific number of lines
Splits the file "my_file" every 500 lines. Will create files called xx01 xx02 and so on. You can change the prefix by using the -f option. Comes in handy for splitting logfiles for example. I am using it for feeding a logfile parser with smaller files instead of one big file (due to performance reasons)

Download file with multiple simultaneous connections
`aria2c` (from the aria2 project) allows. Change -s 4 to an arbitrary number of segments to control the number of concurrent connections. It is also possible to provide multiple URLs to the same content (potentially over multiple protocols) to download the file concurrently from multiple hosts.

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript (for Windows)
#4345 also works under windows

Send an email from the terminal when job finishes
Might as well include the status code it exited with so you know right away if it failed or not.

Simple Gumblar check command

Exclude inserting a table from a sql import
Starting with a large MySQL dump file (*.sql) remove any lines that have inserts for the specified table. Sometimes one or two tables are very large and uneeded, eg. log tables. To exclude multiple tables you can get fancy with sed, or just run the command again on subsequently generated files.

Content search.
Grep will read the contents of each file in PWD and will use the REs $1 $2 ... $n to match the contents. In case of match, grep will print the appropriate file, line number and the matching line. It's just easier to write $ ff word1 word2 word3 Instead of $ grep -rinE 'word1|word2|word3' .

Wait for file to stop changing
This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds. . It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock. If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends. . This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates, e.g. due to network congestion . How does it work? 'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds 'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds '$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths '[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10 otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat . Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter.

Using NMAP to check if a port is open or close
Using NMAP to check to see if port 22(SSH) is open on servers and network devices.

Ask user to confirm
Returns true if user presses the key. Use it like $ Confirm "Continue" && do action


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: