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Count number of files in subdirectories
For each directory from the current one, list the counts of files in each of these directories. Change the -maxdepth to drill down further through directories.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Clean swap area after using a memory hogging application
When you run a memory intensive application (VirtualBox, large java application, etc) swap area is used as soon as memory becomes insufficient. After you close the program, the data in swap is not put back on memory and that decreases the responsiveness. Swapoff disables the swap area and forces system to put swap data be placed in memory. Since running without a swap area might be detrimental, swapon should be used to activate swap again. Both swapoff and swapon require root privileges.

To get internet connection information .
To get the connection information of protocol tcp and extended infortmation.

Show current iptables rules, with line numbers

Fast search in man files or bz-files by keyword direct by man or bz files
For example we need find fast where located and described keyword COMMIT_EDITMSG in man files. Here example howto solve it by search with command bzgrep in man files. Generally these files in bz compressed format. You can use another keywords to your search. Common syntax is: bzgrep -lE keyword1 /usr/share/man/man?/optional-keyword-to-refine* or bzgrep -lE keyword1 /usr/share/man/man?/* where optional-keyword-to-refine is optional and may be omitted but used to speedup search Of course you may combine other options for bzgrep (its based on grep)

Display a block of text with AWK
I find this terribly useful for grepping through a file, looking for just a block of text. There's "grep -A # pattern file.txt" to see a specific number of lines following your pattern, but what if you want to see the whole block? Say, the output of "dmidecode" (as root): $ dmidecode | awk '/Battery/,/^$/' Will show me everything following the battery block up to the next block of text. Again, I find this extremely useful when I want to see whole blocks of text based on a pattern, and I don't care to see the rest of the data in output. This could be used against the '/etc/securetty/user' file on Unix to find the block of a specific user. It could be used against VirtualHosts or Directories on Apache to find specific definitions. The scenarios go on for any text formatted in a block fashion. Very handy.

New Maintainer for CommandLineFu
Welcome to Jon H. (@fart), the new maintainer of CommandLineFu. . In the absence of a forum, I encourage people welcome him, here, in the comments. . Also... What would you like to improve/change about the site?

Find out my Linux distribution name and version

Re-read partition table on specified device without rebooting system (here /dev/sda).


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