Commands tagged size (62)

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Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).

write text or append to a file
If you just want to write or append some text to a file without having to run a text editor, run this command. After running the command, start typing away. To exit, type . on a line by itself. Replacing the >> with a single > will let you overwrite your file.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Perform Real-time Process Monitoring Using Watch Utility

Remove a range of lines from a file

Change Windows Domain password from Linux
If you use Linux in a Windows domain and there are N days to expiry, this is how you can change it without resorting to a windows machine.

Run a command for a given time
or "Execute a command with a timeout" Run a command in background, sleep 10 seconds, kill it. $! is the process id of the most recently executed background command. You can test it with: find /& sleep10; kill $!

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Keep track of diff progress
You're running a program that reads LOTS of files and takes a long time. But it doesn't tell you about its progress. First, run a command in the background, e.g. $ find /usr/share/doc -type f -exec cat {} + > output_file.txt Then run the watch command. "watch -d" highlights the changes as they happen In bash: $! is the process id (pid) of the last command run in the background. You can change this to $(pidof my_command) to watch something in particular.


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