Commands tagged sort (164)

  • (separator = $IFS)


    2
    ps aux | sort -nk 6
    totti · 2011-08-16 11:04:45 0
  • Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
    h3xx · 2011-08-15 03:10:58 0

  • 16
    find . -type f -printf '%TY-%Tm-%Td %TT %p\n' | sort
    sammcj · 2011-08-14 23:34:10 3
  • If your version of curl does not support the --compressed option, use curl -s http://funnyjunk.com | gunzip instead of curl -s --compressed http://funnyjunk.com


    0
    curl -s --compressed http://funnyjunk.com | awk -F'"' '/ '"'"'mainpagetop24h'"'"'/ { print "http://funnyjunk.com"$4 }' | xargs curl -s | grep -o 'ht.*m/pictures/.*\.jpg\|ht.*m/gifs/.*\.gif' | grep "_......_" | uniq | xargs wget
    laniner · 2011-07-21 15:57:21 0
  • Randomizes a file. The opposite of sort is sort -R!


    2
    sort -R
    RyanM · 2011-07-15 15:35:27 0
  • count connections, group by IP and port


    0
    netstat -nt | awk -F":" '{print $2}' | sort | uniq -c
    sreimann · 2011-07-05 07:53:29 0

  • -2
    cat `ls -r /sys/class/net/*/address` | sort -u
    jaimerosario · 2011-06-02 23:16:37 0
  • List all MAC addresses on a Linux box. sort -u is useful when having virtual interfaces.


    2
    sort -u < /sys/class/net/*/address
    marssi · 2011-05-18 17:50:44 0
  • Sort lines within vi editor. In this example sort lines 33-61 and lines 4-9 asciibetically. Show Sample Output


    6
    :33,61 !sort
    greggster · 2011-05-06 06:10:05 1
  • Credit goes to brun65i but he posted it as a comment instead as an alternative. I hadn't noticed the -h option on sort before and this seems like the cleanest alternative. Thanks Brun65i! Show Sample Output


    0
    du -h --max-depth=1 | sort -hr
    splante · 2011-04-07 18:01:18 0
  • Show disk space info, grepping out the uninteresting ones beginning with ^none while we're at it. The main point of this submission is the way it maintains the header row with the command grouping, by removing it from the pipeline before it gets fed into the sort command. (I'm surprised sort doesn't have an option to skip a header row, actually..) It took me a while to work out how to do this, I thought of it as I was drifting off to sleep last night! Show Sample Output


    0
    df -h | grep -v ^none | ( read header ; echo "$header" ; sort -rn -k 5)
    purpleturtle · 2011-03-16 14:25:45 1

  • -3
    echo Selected $(ls -1 | sort -R | head -n 1)
    Juluan · 2011-03-13 22:06:54 0
  • Select a file/folder at random. Show Sample Output


    -5
    ls -1 | sort -R | sed -n 's/^/Selected /;1p'
    flatcap · 2011-03-13 21:00:28 1
  • Deletes capistrano-style release directories (except that there are dashes between the YYYY-MM-DD) Show Sample Output


    -1
    find . -maxdepth 1 -type d | grep -Pv "^.$" | sort -rn --field-separator="-" | sed -n '3,$p' | xargs rm -rf
    wilmoore · 2011-03-08 17:38:26 0
  • This works by reading in two lines of input, turning each into a list of one-character matches that are sorted and compared.


    2
    (echo foobar; echo farboo) | perl -E 'say[sort<>=~/./g]~~[sort<>=~/./g]?"anagram":"not anagram"'
    doherty · 2011-02-17 02:15:46 0
  • % lsof -v lsof version information: revision: 4.78


    -1
    lsof | awk '/*:https?/{print $2}' | sort -u
    sugitaro · 2011-02-04 01:37:17 0
  • list top committers (and number of their commits) of svn repository. in this example it counts revisions of current directory. Show Sample Output


    2
    svn log -q | grep '^r[0-9]' | cut -f2 -d "|" | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
    kkapron · 2011-01-03 15:23:08 0

  • 2
    awk '{if ($1 ~ /Package/) p = $2; if ($1 ~ /Installed/) printf("%9d %s\n", $2, p)}' /var/lib/dpkg/status | sort -n | tail
    gb38 · 2010-12-14 14:59:42 0
  • This uses some tricks I found while reading the bash man page to enumerate and display all the current environment variables, including those not listed by the 'env' command which according to the bash docs are more for internal use by BASH. The main trick is the way bash will list all environment variable names when performing expansion on ${!A*}. Then the eval builtin makes it work in a loop. I created a function for this and use it instead of env. (by aliasing env). This is the function that given any parameters lists the variables that start with it. So 'aae B' would list all env variables starting wit B. And 'aae {A..Z} {a..z}' would list all variables starting with any letter of the alphabet. And 'aae TERM' would list all variables starting with TERM. aae(){ local __a __i __z;for __a in "$@";do __z=\${!${__a}*};for __i in `eval echo "${__z}"`;do echo -e "$__i: ${!__i}";done;done; } And my printenv replacement is: alias env='aae {A..Z} {a..z} "_"|sort|cat -v 2>&1 | sed "s/\\^\\[/\\\\033/g"' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    for _a in {A..Z} {a..z};do _z=\${!${_a}*};for _i in `eval echo "${_z}"`;do echo -e "$_i: ${!_i}";done;done|cat -Tsv
    AskApache · 2010-10-27 07:16:54 0
  • Grabs the cmdline used to execute the process, and the environment that the process is being run under. This is much different than the 'env' command, which only lists the environment for the shell. This is very useful (to me at least) to debug various processes on my server. For example, this lets me see the environment that my apache, mysqld, bind, and other server processes have. Here's a function I use: aa_ps_all () { ( cd /proc && command ps -A -opid= | xargs -I'{}' sh -c 'test $PPID -ne {}&&test -r {}/cmdline&&echo -e "\n[{}]"&&tr -s "\000" " "<{}/cmdline&&echo&&tr -s "\000\033" "\nE"<{}/environ|sort&&cat {}/limits' ); } From my .bash_profile at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    1
    cd /proc&&ps a -opid=|xargs -I+ sh -c '[[ $PPID -ne + ]]&&echo -e "\n[+]"&&tr -s "\000" " "<+/cmdline&&echo&&tr -s "\000\033" "\nE"<+/environ|sort'
    AskApache · 2010-10-22 02:34:33 3
  • Gives the same results as the command by putnamhill using nine less characters.


    0
    tr -cs A-Za-z '\n' | sort | uniq -ci
    TheMightyBuzzard · 2010-10-20 04:12:58 2

  • 6
    tr A-Z a-z | tr -cs a-z '\n' | sort | uniq -c
    putnamhill · 2010-10-19 22:49:13 3
  • Notes: 1) -n-1 means sort key is the last field 2) -l is important if each separate record is on a new line (usually so for text files) 3) -j tells msort not to create log file (msort.log) in the working directory 4) may need to install msort package. 5) msort does lot more. Check man msort Show Sample Output


    4
    file /bin/* | msort -j -l -n-1 -n2 2> /dev/null
    b_t · 2010-10-05 00:37:33 1
  • Works in sort (GNU coreutils) 7.4, don't know when it was implemented but sometime the last 6 years.


    4
    sort -R SOMEFILE
    miniker84 · 2010-09-16 22:29:27 0
  • Another one. Maybe not the quicker because of the sort command, but it will also look in other man sections. updated with goodevilgenius 'shuf' idea


    -2
    man $(ls -1 /usr/share/man/man?/ | shuf -n1 | cut -d. -f1)
    dooblem · 2010-08-20 23:36:10 0
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