Commands tagged banner (4)

  • Displays a scrolling banner which loops until you hit Ctrl-C to terminate it. Make sure you finish your banner message with a space so it will loop nicely.


    11
    while [ 1 ]; do banner 'ze missiles, zey are coming! ' | while IFS="\n" read l; do echo "$l"; sleep 0.01; done; done
    craigds · 2009-12-14 07:40:07 2
  • # ### ### # # ### ### # # # ## # # ### # # # # ### ## # # # # # # ### # # # # ### # # # # # ### ##### # # ##### # # # ### # # ### # # # # # ### # # ### # # ##### ### ### # ##### ### ##### # Show Sample Output


    5
    watch -tn1 'date +%T | xargs banner'
    kev · 2011-11-20 04:46:02 1
  • Starts and shows a timer. banner command is a part of the sysvbanner package. Instead of the banner an echo or figlet commands could be used. Stop the timer with Ctrl-C and elapsed time will be shown as the result. Show Sample Output


    1
    alias timer='export ts=$(date +%s);p='\''$(date -u -d @"$(($(date +%s)-$ts))" +"%H.%M.%S")'\'';watch -n 1 -t banner $p;eval "echo $p"'
    ichbins · 2013-08-24 16:18:45 1
  • # # ####### # # ####### # # ####### ###### # ###### # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ####### ##### # # # # ### # # # # # ###### # # # # # # # # # # ### # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ####### ####### ####### ####### # ## ## ####### # # ####### ###### Show Sample Output


    -4
    paste <(banner hello,\ ) <(banner world)
    kev · 2011-11-21 06:38:16 0

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