Commands tagged argument (7)

  • After executing a command with multiple arguments like cp ./temp/test.sh ~/prog/ifdown.sh you can paste any argument of the previous command to the console, like ls -l ALT+1+. is equivalent to ls -l ./temp/test.sh ALT+0+. stands for command itself ('ls' in this case) Simple ALT+. cycles through last arguments of previous commands.


    12
    <ALT>+<.> or <ALT>+<NUM>+<.> or <ALT>+<NUM>,<ALT>+<.>
    aikikode · 2011-03-01 17:41:08 0
  • Bash's history expansion character, "!", has many features, including "!:" for choosing a specific argument (or range of arguments) from the history. The gist is any number after !: is the number of the argument you want, with !:1 being the first argument and !:0 being the command. See the sample output for a few examples. For full details search for "^HISTORY EXPANSION" in the bash(1) man page.    Note that this version improves on the previous function in that it handles arguments that include whitespace correctly. Show Sample Output


    10
    !:n
    hackerb9 · 2013-09-15 03:41:13 1
  • A really fun vim oneliner for auto documenting your option's parsing in your script. # print the text embeded in the case that parse options from command line. # the block is matched with the marker 'CommandParse' in comment, until 'esac' extract_cmdl_options() { # use vim for parsing: # 1st grep the case block and copy in register @p + unindent in the buffer of the file itself # 2nd filter lines which start with --opt or +opt and keep comment on hte following lines until an empty line # 3rd discard changes in the buffer and quit vim -n -es -c 'g/# CommandParse/+2,/^\s\+esac/-1 d p | % d | put p | % -c 'g/^\([-+]\+[^)]\+\))/,/^\(\s\+[^- \t#]\|^$\)/-1 p' \ -c 'q!' $0 } example code:http://snipplr.com/view/25059/display-embeded-comments-for-every-opt-usefull-for-auto-documenting-your-script/ Show Sample Output


    0
    vim -n -es -c 'g/# CommandParse/+2,/^\s\+esac/-1 d p | % d | put p | %<' -c 'g/^\([-+]\+[^)]\+\))/,/^\(\s\+[^- \t#]\|^$\)/-1 p' -c 'q!' $0
    syladmin · 2009-12-19 08:32:00 0
  • If Argument $1 is supplied, assign it to variable. Otherwise continue on.


    0
    [ $1 ] && my_dir=$1
    robinsonaarond · 2011-11-30 15:02:20 0
  • This gets the Nth argument in the last line of your history file. This is useful where history is being written after each command, and you want to use arguments from the previous command in the current command, such as when doing copies/moving directories etc. I wrote this after getting irritated with having to continually type in long paths/arguments. You could also use $_ if all you want is the last argument. Show Sample Output


    0
    function garg () { tail -n 1 ${HISTFILE} | awk "{ print \$$1 }" }
    plasticphyte · 2013-09-10 04:07:46 0

  • 0
    _autoOptions() { local cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]} COMPREPLY=( $(compgen -W "--fooOption --barOption -f -b" -- $cur) ) ;}; complete -F _autoOptions autoOptions
    totti · 2013-10-16 09:46:54 0
  • This is a alternate command I like to use instead of TOP or HTOP to see what are the processes which are taking up the most memory on a system. It shows the username, process ID, CPU usage, Memory usage, thread ID, Number of threads associated with parent process, Resident Set Size, Virtual Memory Size, start time of the process, and command arguments. Then it's sorted by memory and showing the top 10 with head. This of course can be changed to suit you needs. I have a small system which is why Firefox is taking so much resources. Show Sample Output


    0
    watch -n .8 'ps -eaLo uname,pid,pcpu,pmem,lwp,nlwp,rss,vsz,start_time,args --sort -pmem| head -10'
    ubercoo · 2016-05-11 01:05:53 0

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Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Rename files in batch

Realtime apache hits per second
Change the cut range for hits per 10 sec, minute and so on... Grep can be used to filter on url or source IP.

change up n directories
Change n directories up, without parameters change one up

grep certain file types recursively
doesn't do case-insensitive filenames like iname but otherwise likely to be faster

send DD a signal to print its progress
every 1sec sends DD the USR1 signal which causes DD to print its progress.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Display a block of text with AWK

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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