Commands tagged recursive (34)

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quick integer CPU benchmark
This is a quick and dirty way to generate a (non-floating-point) CPU-bound task to benchmark. Adjust "20" to higher or lower values, as needed. As a benchmark this is probably a little less bogus than bogomips, and it will run anywhere 'bc' does.

Give any files that don't already have it group read permission under the current folder (recursive)
Makes any files in the current directory (and any sub-directories) group-readable. Using the "! -perm /g=r" limits the number of files to only those that do not already have this property Using "+" on the end of the -exec body tells find to build the entire command by appending all matching files before execution, so invokes chmod once only, not once per file.

Delete all git branches except master
Delete all your branches except master (useful after archiving branches)

Generate binary sequence data

Undo mkdir -p new/directory/path
Removes all directories on given path, working from right to left, and stops when reaching a non-empty directory Counterpart of $ mkdir -p new/directory/path Shortcut (must be issues as next command immediately after mkdir): $ ^mk^rm ( see http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/19/runs-previous-command-but-replacing )

Display all shell functions set in the current shell environment
Uses the shell builtin `declare` with the '-f' flag to output only functions to grep out only the function names. You can use it as an alias or function like so: alias shfunctions="builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'" shfunctions () { builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'; }

find files in a date range
Find files in a specific date range - in this case, the first half of last year. -newermt = modification time of the file is more recent than this date GNU find allows any date specfication that GNU date would accept, e.g. $ find . -type f -newermt "3 years ago" ! -newermt "2 years ago" or $ find . -type f -newermt "last monday"

Indent a one-liner.
Bash builtin type also indents the function.

ssh autocomplete based on ~/.ssh/config
I use this in my bashrc to expand hosts defined in ~/.ssh/config: function _ssh_completion() { perl -ne 'print "$1 " if /^Host (.+)$/' ~/.ssh/config } complete -W "$(_ssh_completion)" ssh Here's a great article on how to setup your own ~/.ssh/config: http://blogs.perl.org/users/smylers/2011/08/ssh-productivity-tips.html

Beep siren
Infinitely plays beeps with sinusoidally changing sound frequency. Ideal for alarm on an event.


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