Commands tagged dbus-send (3)

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Capture video of a linux desktop
This is identical to the original command, but allows you to specify an offset if you have multiple monitors. In this case you'll record a 1366x768 window that's offset by 1366 pixels in the x axis and 0 pixels in the y axis. Note also that the -sameq option has been replaced by -qscale - at least in ffmpeg version 1.2.1 on Fedora 19.

Start another X session in a window
You might have Xnest (older) rather than Xephyr. You can experiment with other desktops eg: startx /usr/bin/start-kde -- /usr/bin/Xephyr :2 You can start X on a remote machine (although I'd recommend vnc for anything slower than a LAN): startx /usr/bin/ssh -X gnome-session -- /usr/bin/Xephyr :2 Or just start another X session locally talking to the remote backend:

sync svn working copy and remote repository (auto adding new files)
Lists the local files that are not present in the remote repository (lines beginning with ?) and add them.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Create a large test file (taking no space).

write by vim need root privilege

Merge video files together using mencoder (part of mplayer)
Using mplayer's mencoder, you can merge video files together. '-oac' specifies the audio encoding (here copy, to just copy and not compress) '-ovc' specifies the video encoding (same thing).

Print current runlevel
Prints current runlevel and system start time. On older systems it also shows the last init state. Pretty useful on remote systems, pretty useless on local ones :)

download the contents of a remote folder in the current local folder

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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