Commands tagged ifconfig (53)

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Check if a machine is online
PING parameters c 1 limits to 1 pinging attempt q makes the command quiet (or silent mode) /dev/null 2>&1 is to remove the display && echo ONLINE is executed if previous command is successful (return value 0) || echo OFFLINE is executed otherwise (return value of 1 if unreachable or 2 if you're offline yourself). I personally use this command as an alias with a predefined machine name but there are at least 2 improvements that may be done. Asking for the machine name or IP Escaping the output so that it displays ONLINE in green and OFFLINE in red (for instance).

Check how far along (in %) your program is in a file
Imagine you've started a long-running process that involves piping data, but you forgot to add the progress-bar option to a command. e.g. $ xz -dc bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program > summary . This command uses lsof to see how much data xz has read from the file. $ lsof -o0 -o -Fo FILENAME Display offsets (-o), in decimal (-o0), in parseable form (-Fo) This will output something like: . p12607 f3 o0t45187072 . Process id (p), File Descriptor (f), Offset (o) . We stat the file to get its size $ stat -c %s FILENAME . Then we plug the values into awk. Split the line at the letter t: -Ft Define a variable for the file's size: -s=$(stat...) Only work on the offset line: /^o/ . Note this command was tested using the Linux version of lsof. Because it uses lsof's batch option (-F) it may be portable. . Thanks to @unhammer for the brilliant idea.

Visualizing system performance data

Check reverse DNS
I'm just a simple programmer. I find dig too verbose. host tells me alias(es) and IP address in a quick to grok format with nothing special to remember for input parameters. With thanks to http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-to-test-or-check-reverse-dns/

Recursively remove .svn directories from the current location

Bash logger

swap stdout and stderr
Possible use, to filter something in stderr: (/usr/bin/$COMMAND $PARAM 3>&1 1>&2 2>&3 | grep -v $uninteresting_error ) 3>&1 1>&2 2>&3

Colorize make, gcc, and diff output
Colorize output of make, gcc/g++ or diff, making it easier to read at a glance. They are not distributed with make, diff or gcc, but are usually available in the repositories.

Always tail/edit/grep the latest file in a directory of timestamped files
zsh only If you have this command in your history, you can always re-run it and have it reference the latest file. The glob matches all timestamped files and then the resulting array is sorted by modification time (m) and then the first element in the sorted array is chosen (the latest)

Watching Command
If you need to keep an eye on a command whose output is changing, use the watch command. For example, to keep an eye on your load average


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