Commands tagged quotes (5)

  • Turns out smacie.com has a text file containing every single one of the borat quotes, each one on a newline. This makes it very convenient, as this can be done without any sed-parsing, and uses less bandwitdth! Note that borate quotes are quite offensive, much more so than "fortunes-off"! Show Sample Output


    2
    curl -s "http://smacie.com/randomizer/borat.txt" | shuf -n 1 -
    benjabean1 · 2014-12-16 04:18:48 0
  • ls -Q will show the filenames in quotes. xargs -p rm will print all the filenames piped from ls -Q and ask for confirmation before deleting the files. without the -Q switch, if we have spaces in names, then the files won't be deleted. Show Sample Output


    1
    ls -Q * | xargs -p rm
    temp_reg · 2010-01-27 02:46:49 6
  • I improved a bit on the original by only using sed and extracting the quote with a matching group. Use -nE for sed on Mac OSX Use -nr for sed on Linux. Warning! The quotes from Borat are definitely offensive. Show Sample Output


    1
    curl -s http://smacie.com/randomizer/borat.html | sed -nE "s# *<td valign=\"top\"><big><big><big><font face=\"Comic Sans MS\">(.*)</font></big></big></big></td>#\1#p"
    phymata · 2012-07-18 21:31:43 0
  • Just pulls a quote for each day and displays it in a notification bubble... or you can change it a bit and just have it run in the terminal wget -q -O "quote" https://www.goodreads.com/quotes_of_the_day;echo "Quote of the Day";cat quote | grep '&ldquo;\|/author/show' | sed -e 's/<[a-zA-Z\/][^>]*>//g' | sed 's/&ldquo;//g' | sed 's/&rdquo;//g'; rm -f quote Show Sample Output


    0
    wget -q -O "quote" https://www.goodreads.com/quotes_of_the_day;notify-send "$(echo "Quote of the Day";cat quote | grep '&ldquo;\|/author/show' | sed -e 's/<[a-zA-Z\/][^>]*>//g' | sed 's/&ldquo;//g' | sed 's/&rdquo;//g')"; rm -f quote
    nowhereman88 · 2014-06-15 03:17:19 0
  • I always forget this one and find all kinds of complex solutions on google. Also works great while piping data. ex. 'cat data | process-data | tr -d "\"" > processed-data-without-quotes'


    0
    tr -d "\"" < infile.csv > noquotes.csv
    UnklAdM · 2015-09-11 23:41:48 1

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Insert commas to make reading numbers easier in the output of ls
This modifies the output of ls so that the file size has commas every three digits. It makes room for the commas by destructively eating any characters to the left of the size, which is probably okay since that's just the "group".   Note that I did not write this, I merely cleaned it up and shortened it with extended regular expressions. The original shell script, entitled "sl", came with this description:    : '  : For tired eyes (sigh), do an ls -lF plus whatever other flags you give  : but expand the file size with commas every 3 digits. Really helps me  : distinguish megabytes from hundreds of kbytes...  :  : Corey Satten, [email protected], 11/8/89  : '   Of course, some may suggest that fancy new "human friendly" options, like "ls -Shrl", have made Corey's script obsolete. They are probably right. Yet, at times, still I find it handy. The new-fangled "human-readable" numbers can be annoying when I have to glance at the letter at the end to figure out what order of magnitude is even being talked about. (There's a big difference between 386M and 386P!). But with this nifty script, the number itself acts like a histogram, a quick visual indicator of "bigness" for tired eyes. :-)

remove leading blank lines

Btrfs: Find file names with checksum errors
Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes. The files may need to be deleted and replaced with backups.

Binary clock
Fun idea! This one adds seconds and keeps running on the same line. Perl's probably cheating though. :)

repeat any string or char n times without spaces between
(here is character '+' repeated 80 times) Sometimes needed to enhance the title of the script.

ssh autocomplete based on ~/.ssh/config
I use this in my bashrc to expand hosts defined in ~/.ssh/config: function _ssh_completion() { perl -ne 'print "$1 " if /^Host (.+)$/' ~/.ssh/config } complete -W "$(_ssh_completion)" ssh Here's a great article on how to setup your own ~/.ssh/config: http://blogs.perl.org/users/smylers/2011/08/ssh-productivity-tips.html

Generate random valid mac addresses
Ruby version. Also, a perl version: $perl -e 'printf("%.2x.",rand(255))for(1..5);printf("%.2x\n",rand(255))'

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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