Commands tagged sed (353)


  • 9
    sed '/^#.*DEBUG.*/ s/^#//' $FILE
    svg · 2009-07-30 09:30:17 0

  • 8
    sed -i 's/^.*DEBUG.*/#&/' $file
    svg · 2009-07-30 09:20:37 1
  • Limited, but useful construct to extract text embedded in XML tags. This will only work if bar is all on one line. If nobody posts an alternative for the multiline sed version, I'll figure it out later...


    4
    sed -n 's/.*<foo>\([^<]*\)<\/foo>.*/\1/p'
    recursiverse · 2009-07-23 07:59:30 0
  • the f is for file and - stdout, This way little shorter. I Like copy-directory function It does the job but looks like SH**, and this doesn't understand folders with whitespaces and can only handle full path, but otherwise fine, function copy-directory () { ; FrDir="$(echo $1 | sed 's:/: :g' | awk '/ / {print $NF}')" ; SiZe="$(du -sb $1 | awk '{print $1}')" ; (cd $1 ; cd .. ; tar c $FrDir/ )|pv -s $SiZe|(cd $2 ; tar x ) ; } Show Sample Output


    -11
    (cd /source/dir ; tar cv .)|(cd /dest/dir ; tar xv)
    marssi · 2009-07-19 10:31:13 6
  • Save the script as: sort_file Usage: sort_file < sort_me.csv > out_file.csv This script was originally posted by Admiral Beotch in LinuxQuestions.org on the Linux-Software forum. I modified this script to make it more portable. Show Sample Output


    0
    infile=$1 for i in $(cat $infile) do echo $i | tr "," "\n" | sort -n | tr "\n" "," | sed "s/,$//" echo done
    iframe · 2009-07-12 21:23:37 0
  • Useful if non-ascii characters in filenames have been improperly encoded. Replace "PROBLEM" with the incorrect characters (e.g. 'é'), and "FIX" with the correct ones (e.g. '?').


    3
    for i in *;do mv "$i" "$(echo $i | sed s/PROBLEM/FIX/g)";done
    AlecSchueler · 2009-06-28 01:50:25 4
  • GNU Sed can 'address' between two regex, but it continues parsing through to the end of the file. This slight alteration causes it to terminate reading the input file once the STOP match is made. In my example I have included an extra '/START/d' as my 'start' marker line contains the 'stop' string (I'm extracting data between 'resets' and using the time stamp as the 'start'). My previous coding using grep is slightly faster near the end of the file, but overall (extracting all the reset cycles in turn) the new SED method is quicker and a lot neater. Show Sample Output


    3
    sed -n '/START/,${/STOP/q;p}'
    mungewell · 2009-06-19 15:27:36 1
  • will show: installed linux headers, image, or modules: /^ii/!d avoiding current kernel: /'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d only application names: s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/ avoiding stuff without a version number: /[0-9]/!d Show Sample Output


    4
    dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d'
    plasticdoc · 2009-06-19 10:23:38 1
  • will purge: only installed apps: /^ii/!d avoiding current kernel stuff: /'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d using app names: s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/ avoiding stuff without a version number: /[0-9]/!d


    7
    dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d' | xargs sudo apt-get -y purge
    plasticdoc · 2009-06-19 10:11:00 0
  • curl doesn't provide url-encoding for 'GET' data, it have an option '--data-urlencode', but its only for 'POST' data. Thats why I need to write down this commandline. With 'perl', 'php' and 'python', this is one liner, but just I wrote it for fun. Works in Ubuntu, will work in all linux varients(I hope it will work in unix varients also). Show Sample Output


    -3
    (Command too long..See sample Output..)
    mohan43u · 2009-06-14 20:34:37 0
  • I've been auto-generating some complex GnuPlots; with multiplots the first plot of each group needs to be a 'plot' whereas the others need to be 'replots' to allow overplotting/autoscaling/etc to work properly. This is used to replace only the first instance of 'replot'. Show Sample Output


    5
    sed '/MARKER/{N;s/THIS/THAT/}'
    mungewell · 2009-06-12 02:29:50 0
  • ok I'm sure it's not pretty Show Sample Output


    -2
    lynx -source http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/random | sed 's/<[^>]*>//g' | head -1037 | tail -10 | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed '/^$/d' | head -2
    lxtips · 2009-06-02 09:48:59 6
  • echo "http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com" | sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e http://www.google.com Works under bash on linux. just alter the '-e' option to its corresponding equivalence in your system to execute escape characters correctly.


    12
    sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e
    mohan43u · 2009-05-25 05:37:44 3

  • 5
    sed -i 'your sed stuff here' file
    Keruspe · 2009-05-19 15:35:42 1
  • With this command you can use shell variables inside sed scripts. This is useful if the script MUST remain in an external file, otherwise you can simply use an inline -e argument to sed.


    -1
    expanded_script=$(eval "echo \"$(cat ${sed_script_file})\"") && sed -e "${expanded_script}" your_input_file
    giuseppe_rota · 2009-05-07 14:21:14 0
  • This is a working version, though probably clumsy, of the script submitted by felix001. This works on ubuntu and CygWin. This would be great as a bash function, defined in .bashrc. Additionally it would work as a script put in the path. Show Sample Output


    0
    lynx -dump randomfunfacts.com | grep -A 3 U | sed 1D
    xizdaqrian · 2009-05-05 07:52:10 8
  • This command might not be useful for most of us, I just wanted to share it to show power of command line. Download simple text version of novel David Copperfield from Poject Gutenberg and then generate a single column of words after which occurences of each word is counted by sort | uniq -c combination. This command removes numbers and single characters from count. I'm sure you can write a shorter version. Show Sample Output


    -4
    wget -q -O- http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/cprfd10.txt | sed '1,419d' | tr "\n" " " | tr " " "\n" | perl -lpe 's/\W//g;$_=lc($_)' | grep "^[a-z]" | awk 'length > 1' | sort | uniq -c | awk '{print $2"\t"$1}'
    alperyilmaz · 2009-05-04 16:00:39 8
  • Ok so it's rellay useless line and I sorry for that, furthermore that's nothing optimized at all... At the beginning I didn't managed by using netstat -p to print out which process was handling that open port 4444, I realize at the end I was not root and security restrictions applied ;p It's nevertheless a (good ?) way to see how ps(tree) works, as it acts exactly the same way by reading in /proc So for a specific port, this line returns the calling command line of every thread that handle the associated socket


    -5
    p=$(netstat -nate 2>/dev/null | awk '/LISTEN/ {gsub (/.*:/, "", $4); if ($4 == "4444") {print $8}}'); for i in $(ls /proc/|grep "^[1-9]"); do [[ $(ls -l /proc/$i/fd/|grep socket|sed -e 's|.*\[\(.*\)\]|\1|'|grep $p) ]] && cat /proc/$i/cmdline && echo; done
    j0rn · 2009-04-30 12:39:48 1
  • A powerfull way to rename file using sed groups. & stand for the matched expression. \1 referes to the first group between parenthesis. \2 to the second. Show Sample Output


    6
    ls | sed -n -r 's/banana_(.*)_([0-9]*).asc/mv & banana_\2_\1.asc/gp' | sh
    log0 · 2009-04-28 17:53:58 0
  • If you're like me and want to keep all your music rated, and you use xmms2, you might like this command. I takes 10 random songs from your xmms2 library that don't have any rating, and adds them to your current playlist. You can then rate them in another xmms2 client that supports rating (I like kuechenstation). I'm pretty sure there's a better way to do the grep ... | sed ... part, probably with awk, but I don't know awk, so I'd welcome any suggestions. Show Sample Output


    3
    xmms2 mlib search NOT +rating | grep -r '^[0-9]' | sed -r 's/^([0-9]+).*/\1/' | sort -R | head | xargs -L 1 xmms2 addid
    goodevilgenius · 2009-04-16 20:27:30 4
  • If you need to print some portion of a huge file, let's say you want to print from line 200 to 300, you can use this command to print the line from LINE1 to LINE2 of file FILE.


    -5
    Printing portion of a big file
    acirulli · 2009-03-30 11:08:38 2
  • Allows for quick mass renaming, assuming the user has some familiarity with regular expressions. Basically, it replaces the original_file_name in the output of ls with "mv -v original_file_name new_file_name" and passes the output to sh. Show Sample Output


    -2
    ls /some/directory | sed -rn -e 's/input_file_regex/mv -v & output_file_name/p' | sh
    polar · 2009-03-25 09:20:15 4
  • Leading zeros might help correct sorting and they can be removed by sed after sorting Show Sample Output


    2
    sed 's/\b\(0*\)//g' filename
    alperyilmaz · 2009-03-24 20:19:42 1
  • Does not necessarily require a file to process, it can be used in a pipe as well: cat filename | sed -e :a -e 's/\(.*[0-9]\)\([0-9]\{3\}\)/\1,\2/;ta' I don't remember where I copy/pasted this from, I wish I credited the original author Show Sample Output


    3
    sed -e :a -e 's/\(.*[0-9]\)\([0-9]\{3\}\)/\1,\2/;ta' filename
    alperyilmaz · 2009-03-24 20:06:02 1
  • NOT MINE! Taken from hackzine.com blog. It creates a tree-style output of all the (sub)folders and (sub)files from the current folder and down(deeper) Quoting some of hackzine's words "Murphy Mac sent us a link to a handy find/sed command that simulates the DOS tree command that you might be missing on your Mac or Linux box. [..split...] Like most things I've seen sed do, it does quite a bit in a single line of code and is completely impossible to read. Sure it's just a couple of substitutions, but like a jack in the box, it remains a surprise every time I run it." Show Sample Output


    -1
    find . -print | sed -e 's;[^/]*/;|____;g;s;____|; |;g'
    JesusSuperstar · 2009-03-12 22:25:26 4
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a function to find the fastest DNS server
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Set a Reminder for yourself via the notification system
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Backup (archive) your Gmail IMAP folders.
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Install pip with Proxy
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"hidden" remote shell
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check open ports without netstat or lsof

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
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play high-res video files on a slow processor
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