Commands tagged srm (1)

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Produce a pseudo random password with given length in base 64
Of course you will have to install Digest::SHA and perl before this will work :) Maximum length is 43 for SHA256. If you need more, use SHA512 or the hexadecimal form: sha256_hex()

Mount a temporary ram partition
Makes a partition in ram which is useful if you need a temporary working space as read/write access is fast. Be aware that anything saved in this partition will be gone after your computer is turned off.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Show contents of all git objects in a git repo
This script finds all git objects and `git cat-file`'s their content. This is really just a helper function to play around with the internals of git repositories. See https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Git-Internals-Git-Objects of more info.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Compression formats Benchmark
See: http://imgur.com/JgjK2.png for example. Do some serious benchmarking from the commandline. This will write to a file with the time it took to compress n bytes to the file (increasing by 1). Run: $ gnuplot -persist

Use Kernighan & Ritchie coding style in C program

View advanced Sort options, Quick Reference Help Alias
Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example). # Sorts by file permissions $ find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20% 00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp 00755 drwxr-xr-x . 00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m 00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess # Shows uniq history fast $ history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50% exec bash -lxv export TERM=putty-256color Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Top 30 History
Top 30 History Command line with histogram display

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.


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