Commands tagged busybox (3)


  • 2
    function stringContains() { [ -z "${2##*$1*}" ] && [ -z "$1" -o -n "$2" ]; };
    mikhail · 2019-04-12 20:51:27 22
  • This is a minimalistic version of the ubiquitious Google definition screen scraper. This version was designed not only to run fast, but to work using BusyBox. BusyBox is a collection of basic Unix tools that have been compiled into a single binary to save space on tiny installations of Unix. For example, although my phone doesn't have perl or the GNU utilities, it does have BusyBox's stripped down versions of wget, tr, and sed. It turns out that those tools suffice for many tasks. Known Bugs: This script does not handle HTML entities at all. I don't think there's an easy way to do that within BusyBox, but I'd love to see it if someone could do it. Also, this script can only define a single word, not phrases. (Well, you could if you typed in %20, but that'd be gross.) Lastly, this script does not show the URL where definitions were found. Given the randomness of the Net, that last bit of information is often key. Show Sample Output


    0
    wget -q -U busybox -O- "http://www.google.com/search?ie=UTF8&q=define%3A$1" | tr '<' '\n' | sed -n 's/^li>\(.*\)/\1\n/p'
    hackerb9 · 2010-02-01 13:01:47 8
  • Useful if localhost is a small machine running BusyBox, which uses a slightly unusual format to set the date. Remotehost can be pretty much any Linux machine, including one running BusyBox. Uses UTC for portability.


    0
    date -u `ssh user@remotehost date -u '+%m%d%H%M%Y.%S'`
    scruss · 2014-02-10 03:11:14 3

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Rapidly invoke an editor to write a long, complex, or tricky command
Allows you to edit your command using your chosen editor. Works in bash with "set -o vi".

Print a random 8 digit number
Don't need to pipe the output into rs if you just tell jot to use a null separator character.

Open (in vim) all modified files in a git repository
For editing files added to the index: $ vim `git diff --name-only --cached` To edit all changed files: $ vim `git diff --name-only HEAD` To edit changed files matching glob: $ vim `git diff --name-only -- '*.html'` If the commands needs to support filenames with whitespace, it gets a bit hacky (see http://superuser.com/questions/336016/invoking-vi-through-find-xargs-breaks-my-terminal-why for the reason): $ git diff --name-only -z | xargs -0 bash -c '

Run a command for blocks of output of another command
The given example collects output of the tail command: Whenever a line is emitted, further lines are collected, until no more output comes for one second. This group of lines is then sent as notification to the user. You can test the example with $ logger "First group"; sleep 1; logger "Second"; logger "group"

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

A bash timer
Starts and shows a timer. banner command is a part of the sysvbanner package. Instead of the banner an echo or figlet commands could be used. Stop the timer with Ctrl-C and elapsed time will be shown as the result.

Find the package that installed a command

command to change the exif date time of a image

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Recursivly search current directory for files larger than 100MB


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