Commands tagged temperature (4)

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Find which service was used by which port number

Remove annoying OS X DS_Store folders
Recursively removes all those hidden .DS_Store folders starting in current working directory.

Test I/O performance by timing the writing of 100Mb to disk
Write 200 blocks of 512k to a dummy file with dd, timing the result. The is useful as a quick test to compare the performance of different file systems.

Do some learning...
no loop, only one call of grep, scrollable ("less is more", more or less...)

Count accesses per domain
count the times a domain appears on a file which lines are URLs in the form http://domain/resource.

history autocompletion with arrow keys
This will enable the possibility to navigate in the history of the command you type with the arrow keys, example "na" and the arrow will give all command starting by na in the history.You can add these lines to your .bashrc (without &&) to use that in your default terminal.

Number of files in a SVN Repository
This command will output the total number of files in a SVN Repository.

Get your public ip

Getting ESP and EIP addresses from running processes
'ps' let you specify the format that you want to see on the output.

Force wrap all text to 80 columns in Vim
This is assuming that you're editing some file that has not been wrapped at 80 columns, and you want it to be wrapped. While in Vim, enter ex mode, and set the textwidth to 80 columns: $ :set textwidth=80 Then, press: $ gg to get to the top of the file, and: $ gqG to wrap every line from the top to the bottom of the file at 80 characters. Of course, this will lose any indentation blocks you've setup if typing up some source code, or doing type setting. You can make modifications to this command as needed, as 'gq' is the formatting command you want, then you could send the formatting to a specific line in the file, rather than to the end of the file. $ gq49G Will apply the format from your current cursor location to the 49th row. And so on.


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