Commands tagged points (3)

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Remove spaces from filenames - through a whole directory tree.
An example of zsh glob qualifiers.

Generate a binary file with all ones (0xff) in it
This is similar to how you would generate a file with all zeros $ dd if=/dev/zero of=allzeros bs=1024 count=2k

camelcase to underscore
For mac users !

Get gzip compressed web page using wget.
Like the original command, but the -f allows this one to succeed even if the website returns uncompressed data. From gzip(1) on the -f flag: If the input data is not in a format recognized by gzip, and if the --stdout is also given, copy the input data without change to the standard output: let zcat behave as cat.

Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)
Finds duplicates based on MD5 sum. Compares only files with the same size. Performance improvements on: $find -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate The new version takes around 3 seconds where the old version took around 17 minutes. The bottle neck in the old command was the second find. It searches for the files with the specified file size. The new version keeps the file path and size from the beginning.

Show directories in the PATH, one per line
Shorter version.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

pip install into current directory without virtualenv
For subsequent commands in the prefixed path: $ PYTHONPATH=$PWD/lib/python*/site-packages ./bin/pip --version

Always tail/edit/grep the latest file in a directory of timestamped files
zsh only If you have this command in your history, you can always re-run it and have it reference the latest file. The glob matches all timestamped files and then the resulting array is sorted by modification time (m) and then the first element in the sorted array is chosen (the latest)

Get absolut path to your bash-script
Another way of doing it that's a bit clearer. I'm a fan of readable code.


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