Commands tagged fast (4)

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list folders containing less than 2 MB of data
Just shortened the awk a bit and removed sed. Edit: I'm assuming there are no spaces in the path. To support white space in pathname try: $ awk '($1 < 2048) {sub(/^[0-9]+[ \t]+/,""); print $0}'

Fast tape rewind
Traditionally we rewind a tape using this syntaxis: $ mt -f /dev/rmt/0cbn rewind Redirecting the dispositive to nothing as shown above is faster. Less typing is always better.

Get playlist for Livestream on YouTube

Adding formatting to an xml document for easier reading
Sometimes you're trying to read through an xml file to determine whats wrong with it and a tool had removed all the linebreaks. xmllint will go ahead and make it pretty for you.

Find if $b is in $a in bash
Find if $b is in $a in bash

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Search some text from all files inside a directory

Check for Firewall Blockage.
This is just one method of checking to see if an IP is blocked via IP tables or CSF. Simple and to the point. Replace xx.xx.xx.xx with the IP you wish to check.

output absolute path of the present working directory
I've seen a lot of overly complicated attempts at figuring out "where am I?" I think this is a part of the problem: type -a pwd force the use of the binary version of `pwd` instead of the built-in with "/bin/pwd -P" -P option provides an absolute path to the present working directory for the overly cautious type: $(which pwd) -P

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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