Commands tagged tail (58)


  • 0
    ls -t1 | head -n1 | xargs tail -f
    patko · 2009-07-29 13:46:29 0
  • If you use 'tail -f foo.txt' and it becomes temporarily moved/deleted (ie: log rolls over) then tail will not pick up on the new foo.txt and simply waits with no output. 'tail -F' allows you to follow the file by it's name, rather than a descriptor. If foo.txt disappears, tail will wait until the filename appears again and then continues tailing.


    15
    tail -F file
    recursiverse · 2009-07-23 07:37:11 1
  • This command finds the 5 (-n5) most frequently updated logs in /var/log, and then does a multifile tail follow of those log files. Alternately, you can do this to follow a specific list of log files: sudo tail -n0 -f /var/log/{messages,secure,cron,cups/error_log} Show Sample Output


    5
    ls -drt /var/log/* | tail -n5 | xargs sudo tail -n0 -f
    kanaka · 2009-07-22 14:44:41 0
  • search the newest *.jpg in the directory an make a copy to newest.jpg. Just change the extension to search other files. This is usefull eg. if your webcam saves all pictures in a folder and you like the put the last one on your homepage. This works even in a directory with 10000 pictures.


    1
    cp `ls -x1tr *.jpg | tail -n 1` newest.jpg
    Psychodad · 2009-06-17 20:32:04 3
  • Works in Ubuntu, I hope it will work on all Linux machines. For Unixes, tail should be capable of handling more than one file with '-f' option. This command line simply take log files which are text files, and not ending with a number, and it will continuously monitor those files. Putting one alias in .profile will be more useful.


    6
    find /var/log -type f -exec file {} \; | grep 'text' | cut -d' ' -f1 | sed -e's/:$//g' | grep -v '[0-9]$' | xargs tail -f
    mohan43u · 2009-06-03 09:47:08 7
  • This truncates any lines longer than 80 characters. Also useful for looking at different parts of the line, e.g. cut -b 50-100 shows columns 50 through 100.


    3
    tail -f logfile.log | cut -b 1-80
    plasticboy · 2009-03-26 18:41:57 1
  • with discard wilcards in bash you can "tail" newer logs files to see what happen, any error, info, warn... Show Sample Output


    5
    tail -f *[!.1][!.gz]
    piscue · 2009-03-06 16:24:44 3
  • It displays, last 15 yum operations (in last operation as first row order) with its dates. Change 15 to any number of operations you need to display or remove "| tac" to see it in reverse order (last operation as last row)


    0
    tail -n 15 /var/log/yum.log | tac
    alcik · 2009-03-02 08:56:04 1
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