Commands tagged pipe (23)

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Send an email from the terminal when job finishes
Might as well include the status code it exited with so you know right away if it failed or not.

show all established tcp connections on os x

Most simple way to get a list of open ports

Convert JSON to YAML
Requires installing json2yaml via npm: npm install -g json2yaml (can also pipe from stdin) Ref: https://www.npmjs.com/package/json2yaml

Decreasing the cdrom device speed
Decreasing the cdrom device speed may be more comfortable to watch films (for example)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Silently deletes lines containing a specific string in a bunch of files
This command will find all occurrences of one or more patterns in a collection of files and will delete every line matching the patterns in every file

Throttle download speed (at speed x )
Axel --max-speed=x, -s x You can specify a speed (bytes per second) here and Axel will try to keep the average speed around this speed. Useful if you don?t want the program to suck up all of your bandwidth.

List all duplicate directories
Very quick! Based only on the content sizes and the character counts of filenames. If both numbers are equal then two (or more) directories seem to be most likely identical. if in doubt apply: $ diff -rq path_to_dir1 path_to_dir2 AWK function taken from here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2912224/find-duplicates-lines-based-on-some-delimited-fileds-on-line

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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