Commands tagged nero (1)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Shuffle mp3 files in current folder and play them.
* grep -i leaves only mp3 files (case insentitive) * sort -R randomizes list (may use GNU 'shuf' instead). * the sed command will add double quotes around each filename (needed if odd characters are present)

Extract IPv4 addressess from file

Show a git log with offsets relative to HEAD
Print a git log (in reverse order) giving a reference relative to HEAD. HEAD (the current revision) can also be referred to as HEAD~0 The previous revision is HEAD~1 then HEAD~2 etc. . Add line numbers to the git output, starting at zero: $ ... | nl -v0 | ... . Insert the string 'HEAD~' before the number using sed: $ ... | sed 's/^ \+/&HEAD~/' . Thanks to bartonski for the idea :-)

Reduce PDF Filesize

Default value or argument
I used it for this function, which prints hashes: function liner { num_lines=${1:-42} echo printf %${num_lines}s|tr " " "#" echo } Note the colon-dash, instead of the usual colon-equals.

Check if you need to run LaTeX to update the TOC
To check if the table-of-content in a LaTeX document is up-to-date, copy it to a backup before running LaTeX and compare the new .toc to the backup. If they are identical, it is updated. If not, you need to run LaTeX again.

Kill multiple instances of a running process

Script executes itself on another host with one ssh command
Now put more interesting stuff on the script in replacement of hostname, even entire functions, etc, and stuff. hosta> cat myScript.sh #!/bin/sh [ $1 == "client" ] && hostname || cat $0 | ssh $1 /bin/sh -s client hosta> myScript.sh hostb hostb hosta>

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

convert a line to a space


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: