Commands tagged laptop (5)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Rename many files in directories and subdirectories
This is probably overkill, but I have some issues when the directories have spaces in their names. The $ find . -type d -print0 | while read -d $'\0' dir; do xxx; done loops over all the subdirectories in this place, ignoring the white spaces (to some extend). $ cd "$dir"; echo " process $dir"; cd -; goes to the directory and back. It also prints some info to check the progress. $ find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.ogg.mp3" -exec rename 's/.ogg.mp3/.mp3/' {} \; renames the file within the current directory. The whole should work with directories and file names that include white spaces.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

First pass dvd rip... The set of commands was too long, so I had to separate them into two.
This set of commands will rip a dvd title using a 2 pass mencoder xvid encode. It will provide a great quality rip. It will rip as close to 700MB as possible. (note the bitrate of -700000) Enjoy!

File rotation without rename command
Rotates log files with "gz"-extension in a directory for 7 days and enumerates the number in file name. i.e.: logfile.1.gz > logfile.2.gz I needed this line due to the limitations on AIX Unix systems which do not ship with the rename command.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

View facebook friend list [hidden or not hidden]
There's no need to be logged in facebook. I could do more JSON filtering but you get the idea... Replace u=4 (Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook creator) with desired uid. Hidden or not hidden... Scary, don't you?

An easter egg built into python to give you the Zen of Python

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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