Commands tagged blinking (1)

  • hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; } hb blinks, hc does a reverse color with background.. both very nice. hc(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 0;tput setab 6`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; } Run this: command ps -Hacl -F S -A f | hc ".*$PPID.*" | hb ".*$$.*" Your welcome ;) From my bash profile - http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    -2
    hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }
    AskApache · 2010-04-07 08:45:26 1

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