Commands tagged macosx (45)

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Copy a file using dc3dd and watch its progress (very nice alternative to dd)
Requires the dc3dd package - available at http://dc3dd.sourceforge.net

Create a random password encrypted with md5 with custom lenght
This was useful to generate random passwords to some webpage users, using the sample code, inside a bash script

set history file length
set how many commands to keep in history Default is 500 Saved in /home/$USER/.bash_history Add this to /home/$USER/.bashrc HISTFILESIZE=1000000000 HISTSIZE=1000000

Using commandoutput as a file descriptor
Description is moved to "Sample output" because the html sanitizer for commandlinefu breaks the examples..

Show the 20 most CPU/Memory hungry processes
This command will show the 20 processes using the most CPU time (hungriest at the bottom). You can see the 20 most memory intensive processes (hungriest at the bottom) by running: $ ps aux | sort +3n | tail -20 Or, run both: $ echo "CPU:" && ps aux | sort +2n | tail -20 && echo "Memory:" && ps aux | sort +3n | tail -20

Temporarily ignore mismatched SSH host key
This command will bypass checking the host key of the target server against the local known_hosts file. When you SSH to a server whose host key does not match the one stored in your local machine's known_hosts file, you'll get a error like " WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!" that indicates a key mismatch. If you know the key has legitimately changed (like the server was reinstalled), a permanent solution is to remove the stored key for that server in known_hosts. However, there are some occasions where you may not want to make the permanent change. For example, you've done some port-forwarding trickery with ssh -R or ssh -L, and are doing ssh user@localhost to connect over the port-forwarding to some other machine (not actually your localhost). Since this is usually temporary, you probably don't want to change the known_hosts file. This command is useful for those situations. Credit: Command found at http://linuxcommando.blogspot.com/2008/10/how-to-disable-ssh-host-key-checking.html. Further discussion of how it works is there also. Note this is a bit different than command #5307 - with that one you will still be prompted to store the unrecognized key, whereas this one won't prompt you for the key at all.

read unixtimestamp with festival
you will hear how many seconds since 1.1.1970 in english words with billions, millions and thousands. this is very useful, if you want to get over to use the unixtimestamp instead of the 24 hour clock in your dayly life

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Rename files in batch


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