Commands tagged IP (79)

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Quickly graph a list of numbers
Useful when you've produced a large file of numbers, and want to quickly see the distribution. The value of y halfway along the x axis is the median. Simple! Just create the listOfNumbers.txt file with a number on each line to try it out.

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

socat TCP-LISTEN:5500 EXEC:'ssh user@remotehost "socat STDIO UNIX-CONNECT:/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock"'
Listens on local port 5500 and connects to remotehost with username user to tunnel the given socket file. Will work with anything, but can be useful if there's a need for a local application to connect with a remote server which was started without networking.

Find the package that installed a command

Scans for open ports using telnet

Open a file explorer on a split screen inside your vim session
Open a CLI file explorer by splitting up your screen inside your vim session. Besides, you probably are never going to forget this one.

add a gpg key to aptitute package manager in a ubuntu system
when we add a new package to a aptitude (the debian package manager) we need to add the gpg, otherwise it will show warning / error for missing key

Append last argument to last command
Just like "!$", except it does it instantly. Then you can hit enter if you want.

Remote control for Rhythmbox on an Ubuntu Media PC
Note: you'll want to set up pub-key ssh auth. Gives you a quick means of changing volume/tracks/etc for rhythmbox on a remote machine. E.g.: rc --next # Play next track rc --print-playing # Grab the name rc --volume-down rc --help

Find the package that installed a command


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