Commands tagged GNU find (5)

  • I love this function because it tells me everything I want to know about files, more than stat, more than ls. It's very useful and infinitely expandable. find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' | sort -rgbS 50% 00761 drwxrw---x askapache:askapache 777:666 [06/10/10 | 06/10/10 | 06/10/10] [d] /web/cg/tmp The key is: # -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' which believe it or not took me hundreds of tweaking before I was happy with the output. You can easily use this within a function to do whatever you want.. This simple function works recursively if you call it with -r as an argument, and sorts by file permissions. lsl(){ O="-maxdepth 1";sed -n '/-r/!Q1'<<<$@ &&O=;find $PWD $O -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -rgbS 50%; } Personally I'm using this function because: lll () { local a KS="1 -r -g"; sed -n '/-sort=/!Q1' <<< $@ && KS=`sed 's/.*-sort=\(.*\)/\1/g'<<<$@`; find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -k$KS -bS 50%; } # i can sort by user lll -sort=3 # or sort by group reversed lll -sort=4 -r # and sort by modification time lll -sort=6 If anyone wants to help me make this function handle multiple dirs/files like ls, go for it and I would appreciate it.. Something very minimal would be awesome.. maybe like: for a; do lll $a; done Note this uses the latest version of GNU find built from source, easy to build from gnu ftp tarball. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    8
    find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 22:03:08 4
  • The same as the other two alternatives, but now less forking! Instead of using '\;' to mark the end of an -exec command in GNU find, you can simply use '+' and it'll run the command only once with all the files as arguments. This has two benefits over the xargs version: it's easier to read and spaces in the filesnames work automatically (no -print0). [Oh, and there's one less fork, if you care about such things. But, then again, one is equal to zero for sufficiently large values of zero.] Show Sample Output


    5
    find . \( -iname '*.[ch]' -o -iname '*.php' -o -iname '*.pl' \) -exec wc -l {} + | sort -n
    hackerb9 · 2010-05-03 00:16:02 1
  • Find all pngs in directory structure and pngcrush them, none destructive. You can just remove the "{}.crush" part if you want destructive.


    1
    find . -iname '*png' -exec pngcrush -ow -brute {} {}.crush \;
    miniker84 · 2015-09-22 11:10:16 1
  • If you have lots of subversion working copies in one directory and want to see in which repositories they are stored, this will do the trick. Can be convenient if you need to move to a new subversion server. Show Sample Output


    0
    (for i in `find . -maxdepth 2 -name .svn | sed 's/.svn$//'`; do echo $i; svn info $i; done ) | egrep '^.\/|^URL'
    jespere · 2010-05-09 11:54:37 0
  • This requires a version of GNU find that supports the -exec {} + action, but it seems more straightforward than the versions already posted. Show Sample Output


    0
    find . -type f -exec ls -shS {} + | head -10
    erichamion · 2012-07-28 17:21:46 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Toggle a temporary ram partition
Creates a temporary ram partition To use: ram 3 to make a 3gb partition (Defaults to 1gb)

create a progress bar...
A simple way yo do a progress bar like wget.

a shell function to print a ruler the width of the terminal window.

Rename files in batch

Print current runlevel
Prints current runlevel and system start time. On older systems it also shows the last init state. Pretty useful on remote systems, pretty useless on local ones :)

Sort a character string
Sorts a character string, using common shell commands.

Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)

generate random password (works on Mac OS X)
Prepending env LC_CTYPE=C fixes a problem with bad bytes in /dev/urandom on Mac OS X

find read write traffic on disk since startup
The iostat command is used for monitoring system input/output device loading by observing the time the devices are active in relation to their average transfer rates. in ubuntu to get the iostat program do this: sudo apt-get install sysstat i found this command here: http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=54379

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: