Commands tagged s3 (5)

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Listing directory content of a directory with a lot of entries
Ever wanted to get the directory content with 'ls' or 'find' and had to wait minutes until something was printed? Perl to the rescue. The one-liner above(redirected to a file) took less than five seconds to run in a directory with more man 2 million files. One can adapt it to e.g. delete files that match a certain pattern.

Rename files in batch

Find duplicate UID in /etc/passwd
You can use only awk

Project your desktop using xrandr
HDMI-1 is the interface in the example, which can be obtained just by typing xrandr and surfing through the output. There are a hell lot of configurations that can be done but I prefer auto because it works in most cases. $ Lifesaver

Vectorize xkcd strips
Uses ImageMagick and potrace to vectorize the input image, with parameters optimized for xkcd-like pictures.

Find the processes that are on the runqueue. Processes with a status of
Want to know why your load average is so high? Run this command to see what processes are on the run queue. Runnable processes have a status of "R", and commands waiting on I/O have a status of "D". On some older versions of Linux may require -emo instead of -eo. On Solaris: ps -aefL -o s -o user -o comm | egrep "^O|^R|COMMAND"

Terminal - Show directories in the PATH, one per line with sed and bash3.X `here string'

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Do some learning...
I like it sorted... 2> /dev/null was also needless, since our pipes already select stdin, only.

Extend a logical volume to use up all the free space in a volume group


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