Commands tagged cowsay (8)

  • You need to have fortune and cowsay installed. It uses a subshell to list cow files in you cow directory (this folder is default for debian based systems, others might use another folder). you can add it to your .bashrc file to have it great you with something interesting every time you start a new session. Show Sample Output


    10
    fortune | cowsay -f $(ls /usr/share/cowsay/cows/ | shuf -n1)
    zed · 2010-07-08 02:57:52 2

  • 5
    curl -s http://whatthecommit.com/index.txt | cowsay
    adaven · 2011-03-20 17:30:25 0

  • 2
    fortune | toilet -w $(($(tput cols)-5)) -f pagga | cowsay -n -f beavis.zen
    kev · 2012-04-29 06:12:04 3
  • Can be installed in the root crontab if you want it to update your motd. If not on ubuntu you need to change /usr/share/cowsay/cows/* to the location of your cow files. Show Sample Output


    0
    files=(/usr/share/cowsay/cows/*);cowsay -f `printf "%s\n" "${files[RANDOM % ${#files}]}"` "`fortune`"
    dog · 2010-06-02 14:18:28 0
  • recursive cowsay Show Sample Output


    0
    xcowsay "$(cowsay smile)"
    brownman · 2014-06-24 05:17:04 0
  • Shows a list of all installed cows saying a fortune. Also lists the cows names. Pic your favorite cow! Needs cowsay, fortune and ruby installed. The path only applies to OS X with cowsay installed using homebrew. On Linux it might be /usr/share/cowsay/cows/ or similar. Uses ruby just because. Show Sample Output


    -1
    echo 'Dir.foreach("/usr/local/Cellar/cowsay/3.03/share/cows") {|cow| puts cow; system "fortune | cowsay -f /usr/local/Cellar/cowsay/3.03/share/cows/#{cow}" }' | ruby
    orkoden · 2013-04-15 12:27:38 0

  • -2
    cowsay -l | sed '1d;s/ /\n/g' | while read f; do cowsay -f $f $f;done
    fizz · 2010-09-06 03:40:42 1
  • To install on centos 6.2 for Centos auto accept: yum install fortune* -y yum install cowsay* -y Removed the -f command as I dont know how, but it works without it. Almost the same but one folder higher =).


    -2
    fortune | cowsay $(ls/usr/share/cowsay | shuf -n1)
    cablegunmaster · 2014-10-23 10:09:44 1

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