Commands tagged buffer (3)

  • Ever ask yourself "How much data would be lost if I pressed the reset button?" Scary, isn't it? Show Sample Output


    34
    grep ^Dirty /proc/meminfo
    h3xx · 2011-08-24 08:48:49 8
  • Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example). # Sorts by file permissions find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20% 00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp 00755 drwxr-xr-x . 00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m 00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess # Shows uniq history fast history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50% exec bash -lxv export TERM=putty-256color Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    alias sorth='sort --help|sed -n "/^ *-[^-]/s/^ *\(-[^ ]* -[^ ]*\) *\(.*\)/\1:\2/p"|column -ts":"'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 21:30:31 0
  • In this case, we'll be editing every PHP file from the current location down the tree. You can show all the files in the vim buffer with :buffers which outputs something like, :buffers 1 %a "./config/config.php" line 1 2 "./lib/ws-php-library.php" line 0 3 "./lib/css.php" line 0 4 "./lib/mysqldb.class.php" line 0 5 "./lib/config.class.php" line 0 6 "./lib/actions.php" line 0 Press ENTER or type command to continue If you'd like to edit ./lib/mysqldb.class.php for example, enter :b4 anytime you're editing a file. You can switch back and forth. Show Sample Output


    0
    vim `find . -iname '*.php'`
    wsams · 2011-05-11 01:19:28 0

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recursive search and replace old with new string, inside files
recursively traverse the directory structure from . down, look for string "oldstring" in all files, and replace it with "newstring", wherever found also: $ grep -rl oldstring . |xargs perl -pi~ -e 's/oldstring/newstring'

Calculate sum of N numbers (Thanks to flatcap)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

insert ip range using vim
fast method for insert ip range using vim

Indent a one-liner.
I often write a one-liner which I want to use later in a script.

Merge PDFs with Ghostscript wrapped in a function
This is an expansion on a previous entry, which I've wrapped in a function and placed in my profile. The "$@" is a positional parameter, much like "$*", but the parameters are passed on intact, without interpretation or expansion; so you can simply call the function like this: mergepdf * This will output a merged PDF of all PDFs in the current directory. Alternatively, you can simply list them like so: mergepdf 00.pdf 01.pdf 02.pdf ... N.B. Passing a wildcard will merge all PDFs in the current directory in name order, e.g. 00.pdf 01.pdf aa.pdf ab.pdf

convert single digit to double digits
each number in a file name gets expanded to the number of digets provided as arg_1 of the arguments in rjust_file_nums. Put the funciton in the .bashrc file. Be sure to $ source ~/.bashrc so that the function will be accessible from bash.

fast access to any of your favorite directory.
example: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@ubuntu:~/workspace/SVN/haystak-repos/trunk/internal/src$ addpi -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Now that directory is in the list of fast access directories. You can switch to it anytime like this: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@ubuntu:~$ pi internal` user@ubuntu:~/workspace/SVN/haystak-repos/trunk/internal/src$ -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Please note the backquote ( the symbol that shares its key with ~ in the keyboard ) pi will switch you to that directory. To see the list of all fast access directories you have to say "cat ~/.pi"

ISO info
Get details about an ISO image , without burning it or mounting it .

scp a good script from host A which has no public access to host C, but with a hop by host B
middlehost allows ssh access from where you are but not securehost. Use nice ssh piping to simulate scp through A => B => C setting up the shell function if left as an exercise for the reader. ;-) Agent forwarding should avoid password typing.


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