Commands tagged disk (15)

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Check Ram Speed and Type in Linux
from http://maysayadkaba.blogspot.com/2008/08/linux-check-ram-speed-and-type.html

move up through directories faster (set in your /etc/profile or .bash_profile)
You can also remove the "&& pwd" if you don't want it to print out each directory as it moves up.

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

create dir tree
create tree of dir's in one command

Retrieve top ip threats from http://isc.sans.org/sources.html and add them into iptables output chain.
Retrieve top ip threats from http://isc.sans.org/sources.html and add them into iptables output chain.

Print stack trace of a core file without needing to enter gdb interactively
This does almost the same thing as the original, but it runs the full backtrace for _all_ the threads, which is pretty important when reporting a crash for a multithreaded software, since more often than not, the signal handler is executed in a different thread than the crash happened.

Remove a line from a file using sed (useful for updating known SSH server keys when they change)

get ip of all running docker containers
pretty self explanitory

Perl Command Line Interpreter
My Programming Languages professor assigned my class a homework assignment where we had to write a Perl interpreter using Perl. I really like Python's interactive command line interpreter which inspired this Perl script.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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