Commands tagged $PATH (5)

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print multiplication formulas
seq -s ' ' 1 9 | sed -n ':a;p;s/ *\w$//;h;/^$/t;b a;q' | tac | awk '{for(i=1;i

Create a continuous digital clock in Linux terminal
Source: http://www.my-guides.net/en/guides/linux/364-how-to-create-a-continuous-digital-clock-in-linux-terminal

Replace underscores with spaces in filenames and dirnames, recursively into subdirs.
Everyone wants to take spaces out of filenames. Forget that. I want to put them back in. We've got tools and filesystems that support spaces, they look better, so I'm going to use them. Because of how find works I find I need to run this multiple times, if it's renaming subdirs. But it can be re-run without issues. I got this version of the command from a comment in this underscore-generating command. http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/760/find-recursively-from-current-directory-down-files-and-directories-whose-names-contain-single-or-multiple-whitespaces-and-replace-each-such-occurrence-with-a-single-underscore. All I did was change the regex.

Copy a folder tree through ssh using compression (no temporary files)
This command will copy a folder tree (keeping the parent folders) through ssh. It will: - compress the data - stream the compressed data through ssh - decompress the data on the local folder This command will take no additional space on the host machine (no need to create compressed tar files, transfer it and then delete it on the host). There is some situations (like mirroring a remote machine) where you simply cant wait for a huge time taking scp command or cant compress the data to a tarball on the host because of file system space limitation, so this command can do the job quite well. This command performs very well mainly when a lot of data is involved in the process. If you copying a low amount of data, use scp instead (easier to type)

Click on a GUI window and show its process ID and command used to run the process
This command is useful when you want to know what process is responsible for a certain GUI application and what command you need to issue to launch it in terminal.

Display the standard deviation of a column of numbers with awk
This will calculate a running standard deviation in one pass and should never have the possibility for overflow that can happen with other implementations. I suppose there is a potential for underflow in the corner case where the deltas are small or the values themselves are small.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Setting reserved blocks percentage to 1%
According to tune2fs manual, reserved blocks are designed to keep your system from failing when you run out of space. Its reserves space for privileged processes such as daemons (like syslogd, for ex.) and other root level processes; also the reserved space can prevent the filesystem from fragmenting as it fills up. By default this is 5% regardless of the size of the partition. http://www.ducea.com/2008/03/04/ext3-reserved-blocks-percentage/

Get sunrise and sunset times
This will get the sunrise and sunset times of a specific location. To be able to determine $l you need to first go to http://weather.yahoo.com/ and look up your location. The last numbers in the URL will be the $l Instead of forecastrss?w=$l you can also use forecastrss?p=$l and use the RSS link of the city you found. Also see http://developer.yahoo.com/weather/ for more information

Don't spam root. Log your cronjob output to syslog
This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output. Advantages: * This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf * Reduce cron spam to [email protected] (Please stop spaming the sysadmins) * Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile. * Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example. * Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX


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