Commands tagged ebuilds (3)

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shell bash iterate number range with for loop
Bash's arithmetic evaluation.

Determine if photos have been rotated to portrait orientation instead of normal landscape orientation
Most people take photos in landscape orientation (wider than it is tall). Sometimes though you turn the camera sideways to capture a narrow/tall subject. Assuming you then manually rotate those picture files 90 degrees for proper viewing on screen or photo frame, you now have a mix of orientations in your photos directory. This command will print out the names of all the photos in the current directory whose vertical resolution is larger than its horizontal resolution (i.e. portrait orientation). You can then take that list of files and deal with them however you need to, like re-rotating back to landscape for consistent printing with all the others. This command requires the "identify" command from the ImageMagick command-line image manipulation suite. Sample output from identify: $ identify PICT2821.JPG PICT2821.JPG JPEG 1536x2048 1536x2048+0+0 8-bit DirectClass 688KB 0.016u 0:00.006

find directory with most inodes/files
Find which directory in one filesystem that contains most inodes or files.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

See non printable caracters like tabulations, CRLF, LF line terminators ( colored )
For fancier and cleaner output, try the following snippet : $ showendlines(){ while read i; do od --address-radix=n --width=$(wc -c

Create a system overview dashboard on F12 key
Command binds a set of commands to the F12 key. Feel free to alter the dashboard according to your own needs. How to find the key codes? Type $ read Then press the desired key (example: F5) $ ^[[15~ Try $ bind '"\e[15~"':"\"ssh [email protected]\C-m""" or $ bind '"\e[16~"':"\"apachectl -k restart\C-m"""

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Quickly create an alias for changing into the current directory

Google Translate
$ translate [output-language] [source-language] 1) "some phrase" should be in quotes 2) [output-language] - optional (default: English) 3) [source-language] - optional (default: auto) $ translate "bonjour petit lapin" hello little rabbit $ translate "bonjour petit lapin" en hello little rabbit $ translate "bonjour petit lapin" en fr hello little rabbit


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