Commands tagged ebuild (4)

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Recursive chmod all files and directories within the current directory

ThePirateBay.org torrent search
usage: tpb searchterm example: tpb the matrix trilogy This searches for torrents from thepiratebay and displays the top results in reverse order, so the 1st result is at the bottom instead of the top -- which is better for command line users

Show which process is blocking umount (Device or resource is busy)
Instead of using force un-mounting, it's better to find the processes that currently use the relevant folder. Taken from: http://www.linuxhowtos.org/Tips%20and%20Tricks/findprocesses.htm

find all file larger than 500M

Find the package that installed a command

Stop Flash from tracking everything you do.
Brute force way to block all LSO cookies on a Linux system with the non-free Flash browser plugin. Works just fine for my needs. Enjoy.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

generate file list modified since last commit and export to tar file
################################################################################ # get all modified files since last commit and zip them to upload to live server ################################################################################ # delete previous tar output file rm mytarfile.tar -rf #rm c:/tarOutput/*.* -rf # get last commit id and store in variable declare RESULT=$(git log --format="%H" | head -n1) # generate file list and export to tar file git diff-tree -r --no-commit-id --name-only --diff-filter=ACMRT $RESULT | xargs tar -rf mytarfile.tar # extract tar files to specified location tar -xf mytarfile.tar -C c:/tarOutput

Kill all processes that listen to ports begin with 50 (50, 50x, 50xxx,...)
Run netstat as root (via sudo) to get the ID of the process listening on the desired socket. Use awk to 1) match the entry that is the listening socket, 2) matching the exact port (bounded by leading colon and end of column), 3) remove the trailing slash and process name from the last column, and finally 4) use the system(…) command to call kill to terminate the process. Two direct commands, netstat & awk, and one forked call to kill. This does kill the specific port instead of any port that starts with 50. I consider this to be safer.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)


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