Commands tagged terminal emulator, (2)

  • Use GNU/screen as a terminal emulator for anything serial console related. screen /dev/tty eg. screen /dev/ttyS0 9600 MacOSX: http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20061109133825654 Cheat Sheet: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/screen-terminal-emulator-cheat-sheet/ Show Sample Output


    11
    screen /dev/tty<device> 9600
    px · 2010-07-20 09:12:13 29
  • # AllInOne: Update what packages are available, upgrade to new versions, remove unneeded packages # (some are no longer needed, replaced by the ones from ap upgrade), check for dependencies # and clean local cached packages (saved on disk but not installed?,some are needed? [this only cleans unneeded unlike ap clean]). # aliases (copy into ~/.bashrc file): alias a='alias' a ap='apt-get' a r='ap autoremove -y' a up='ap update' a u='up && ap upgrade -y --show-progress && r && ap check && ap autoclean' # && means "and run if the previous succeeded", you can change it to ; to "run even if previous failed". I'm not sure if ap check should be before or after ap upgrade -y, you can also change the alias names. # To expand aliases in bash use ctrl alt e or see this ow.ly/zBKHs # For more useful aliases go to ow.ly/zBMOx


    0
    apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade -y --show-progress && apt-get autoremove -y && apt-get check && apt-get autoclean -y
    unixmonkey78577 · 2014-07-26 12:18:57 4

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