Commands tagged ^M (1)

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drop first column of output by piping to this

Use Kernighan & Ritchie coding style in C program

Batch Convert SVG to PNG
Convert some SVG files into PNG using ImageMagick's convert command.

Run a bash script in debug mode, show output and save it on a file
Sends both stdout and stderr to the pipe which captures the data in the file 'out.test' and sends to stdout of tee (likely /dev/tty unless redirected). Works on Bourne, Korn and Bash shells.

Send multiple attachments using mailx
If you're users have ever asked your script to email their reports in separate attachments instead of tar'ring them into one file, then you can use this. You'll need the mailx package of course. In Unix you'd want to add an additional parameter "-m" (uuencode foo.txt foo.txt; uuencode /etc/passwd passwd.txt)|mailx -m -s "Hooosa!" [email protected]

Change the From: address on the fly for email sent from the command-line
It's very common to have cron jobs that send emails as their output, but the From: address is whatever account the cron job is running under, which is often not the address you want replies to go to. Here's a way to change the From: address right on the command line. What's happening here is that the "--" separates the options to the mail client from options for the sendmail backend. So the -f and -F get passed through to sendmail and interpreted there. This works on even on a system where postfix is the active mailer - looks like postfix supports the same options. I think it's possible to customize the From: address using mutt as a command line mailer also, but most servers don't have mutt preinstalled.

Get MX records for a domain

Search commandlinefu and view syntax-highlighted results in vim
Here is the full function (got trunctated), which is much better and works for multiple queries. function cmdfu () { local t=~/cmdfu; until [[ -z $1 ]]; do echo -e "\n# $1 {{{1" >> $t; curl -s "commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$1/`echo -n $1|base64`/plaintext" | sed '1,2d;s/^#.*/& {{{2/g' | tee -a $t > $t.c; sed -i "s/^# $1 {/# $1 - `grep -c '^#' $t.c` {/" $t; shift; done; vim -u /dev/null -c "set ft=sh fdm=marker fdl=1 noswf" -M $t; rm $t $t.c } Searches commandlinefu for single/multiple queries and displays syntax-highlighted, folded, and numbered results in vim.

check open ports (both ipv4 and ipv6)

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.


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