Commands tagged color (54)

  • Extract a color palette from a image useful for designers. Example usage: extract-palette myawesomeimage.jpg 4 Where the first argument is the image you want to extract a palette from. The second argument is the number of colors you want. It may be the case where you want to change the search space. In that case, change the -resize argument to a bigger or smaller result. See the ImageMagick documentation for the -resize argument. Show Sample Output


    1
    extract-palette() { convert "$1" -resize 300x -dither None -colors "$2" txt: | tail -n +2 | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 3 | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 3;}
    seabre · 2017-06-21 22:07:26 0
  • A simple PS1, ready to be used. Just paste in your ~/.bashrc Show Sample Output


    0
    export PS1="[\[\e[1;32m\]\u\[\e[m\]\[\e[1;31m\]@\[\e[m\]\[\e[3;35m\]\H\[\e[m\] \[\e[1;30m\]| \[\e[m\]\[\e[1;34m\]\w\[\e[m\] \[\e[1;29m\]\t\[\e[m\]]\[\e[1;33m\]$\[\e[m\]"
    thelaser · 2017-03-24 14:21:20 0

  • 0
    ls -l --color | less -R
    flarn2006 · 2016-05-07 17:19:56 0
  • exa

    nothing fancy `ls` alternative `exa`, with most info printed and passed through less with the `-R` (raw) option, to preserve colour output https://github.com/ogham/exa You can add or remove `-@` to print extended attributes for files that have them. Show Sample Output


    -1
    exa -glhrSuU -s size --group-directories-first -@ | less -R
    wires · 2016-02-27 17:19:43 0
  • Don't want to open up an editor just to view a bunch of XML files in an easy to read format? Now you can do it from the comfort of your own command line! :-) This creates a new function, xmlpager, which shows an XML file in its entirety, but with the actual content (non-tag text) highlighted. It does this by setting the foreground to color #4 (red) after every tag and resets it before the next tag. (Hint: try `tput bold` as an alternative). I use 'xmlindent' to neatly reflow and indent the text, but, of course, that's optional. If you don't have xmlindent, just replace it with 'cat'. Additionally, this example shows piping into the optional 'less' pager; note the -r option which allows raw escape codes to be passed to the terminal. Show Sample Output


    0
    xmlpager() { xmlindent "$@" | awk '{gsub(">",">'`tput setf 4`'"); gsub("<","'`tput sgr0`'<"); print;} END {print "'`tput sgr0`'"}' | less -r; }
    hackerb9 · 2015-07-12 09:22:10 0

  • 4
    color () { local color=39; local bold=0; case $1 in green) color=32;; cyan) color=36;; blue) color=34;; gray) color=37;; darkgrey) color=30;; red) color=31;; esac; if [[ "$2" == "bold" ]]; then bold=1; fi; echo -en "\033[${bold};${color}m"; }
    zvyn · 2013-09-06 09:37:42 0
  • eg: printTextInColorRed foo bar foo bar [in red color]


    1
    printTextInColorRed () { echo -e '\033[01;31m\033[K'"$@"'\033[m\033[K' ;} ## print text/string in color red
    totti · 2013-08-28 10:06:59 0
  • The expression $(( $RANDOM * 6 / 32767 + 1 )) generates a random number between 1 and 6, which is then inserted into the escape sequence \e[3_m to switch the foreground color of the terminal to either red, green, yellow, blue, purple or cyan. The color can be reset using the escape sequence \e[0m. The full list of colors can be found here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Color_Bash_Prompt#List_of_colors_for_prompt_and_Bash


    1
    echo -e "\e[3$(( $RANDOM * 6 / 32767 + 1 ))mHello World!"
    nst · 2013-07-28 13:01:12 0

  • 9
    color()(set -o pipefail;"$@" 2>&1>&3|sed $'s,.*,\e[31m&\e[m,'>&2)3>&1
    bkmeneguello · 2013-01-30 13:42:03 0
  • Shows the ?rendering? for each of the 256 colours in both the bold and normal variant. Using seq is helpful to get even lines, passing $((COLUMNS*2)) to column sort-of-handles the nonprintable characters.


    0
    for code in $(seq -w 0 255); do for attr in 0 1; do printf "%s-%03s %bTest%b\n" "${attr}" "${code}" "\e[${attr};38;05;${code}m" "\e[m"; done; done | column -c $((COLUMNS*2))
    claudius · 2013-01-13 18:23:44 0
  • Catches some background colors missed by the highest rated alternative.


    0
    sed -r "s@\^\[{1,2}([0-9]{1,2}(;[0-9]{1,2})?(;[0-9])?(m|K){1,2})?@@g"
    malathion · 2012-11-29 18:42:32 0
  • Unlike other alternatives, this command only relies on bash builtins and should also work on windows platforms with the bash executable. Sparseness corresponds to the number 128 and can be adjusted. To print all possible digits instead of only 0 and 1 replace RANDOM%2 by RANDOM%10 or RANDOM%16 to add letters [A-F]. Show Sample Output


    0
    while true; do printf "\e[32m%X\e[0m" $((RANDOM%2)); for ((i=0; i<$((RANDOM%128)); i++)) do printf " "; done; done
    seb1245 · 2012-11-27 10:40:42 0
  • Using perl and tput, show all the colors with numbers that your actual $TERM can handle. If want to remove the numbers at beginning of new line, it should be something like this: perl -E 'say `tput setb $_`," "x `tput cols`, `tput sgr0` for 0 .. (`tput colors` - 1)'


    3
    perl -E 'say $_,`tput setb $_`," "x(`tput cols`-length("$_")),`tput sgr0` for 0..(`tput colors`-1)'
    MarxBro · 2012-11-22 01:55:51 0
  • save as shell script and pipe your command output Show Sample Output


    0
    #!/bin/zsh SHL='\\e[0;31m' EHL='\\e[0m' while read line; do TEXT=$line for SSTR in $*; do TEXT=$(echo $TEXT | sed -e "s:$SSTR:${SHL}${SSTR}${EHL}:g") done echo -e $TEXT done
    steigr · 2012-06-06 12:57:50 0
  • A tweak using Patola's code as a base, this full-width green matrix display has all the frills (and all the printable characters). You don't need the surrounding parens if you don't care about losing globbing capabilities. Z-shell (/bin/zsh) needs neither the parens nor the `set -o noglob` Screen shot (animated): http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg32/scaled.php?server=32&filename=matrixh.gif&res=landing If it's too slow, try lowering the `sleep 0.05` or even replacing it with `true` (which is faster than `sleep 0`). I squashed it as narrow as I could to conserve space, though somebody could probably squeeze a char or two out. Enjoy!


    0
    (set -o noglob;while sleep 0.05;do for r in `grep -ao '[[:print:]]' /dev/urandom|head -$((COLUMNS/3))`;do [ $((RANDOM%6)) -le 1 ] && r=\ ;echo -ne "\e[$((RANDOM%7/-6+2));32m $r ";done;echo;done)
    adamhotep · 2012-04-13 02:09:10 0
  • required packages: curl, xml2, html2text command is truncated, see 'sample output' Show Sample Output


    3
    open R,"curl -s http://feeds2.feedburner.com/Command-line-fu|xml2|"; while(<R>){ chomp; m(^/rss/channel/item/title=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; ($t,$d,$l)=($_,undef,undef) }; m(^/rss/channel/item/description=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; push @d,$_ }; m(^/rss/channel/item
    bandie91 · 2012-02-24 23:40:02 2
  • Multi-argument version, but with VIM loveliness :D


    2
    cmdfu(){ local TCF="/var/tmp/cmdfu"; echo " Searching..."; curl "http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$(echo "$@" | sed 's/ /-/g')/$(echo -n $@ | base64)/plaintext" --silent > "$TCF"; vim -c "set filetype=sh" -RM "$TCF"; rm "$TCF"; }
    expelledboy · 2011-12-06 10:01:27 2
  • Requires wdiff. Prints the word-by-word diff with the old version highlighted in red, and the new in green. Change the colors by altering 41m and 42m. 45m is more of a magenta and may be easier to read.


    0
    wdiff -n -w $'\033[30;41m' -x $'\033[0m' -y $'\033[30;42m' -z $'\033[0m' oldversion.txt newversion.txt
    abracadabra · 2011-11-10 18:35:41 0
  • If you use colored ls(1), the broken symbolic links significantly differ from regular files and directories in the ls listing. In my case it is bright red. 0 is for getting the first place in the list.


    0
    fail () { ln -s /nonexistent 0_FAIL_${1}; }
    pipeliner · 2011-11-06 20:14:33 0
  • Add the followin to ~/.bashrc #colour export LESS_TERMCAP_mb=$'\E[01;31m' export LESS_TERMCAP_md=$'\E[01;37m' export LESS_TERMCAP_me=$'\E[0m' export LESS_TERMCAP_se=$'\E[0m' export LESS_TERMCAP_so=$'\E[01;44;33m' export LESS_TERMCAP_ue=$'\E[0m' export LESS_TERMCAP_us=$'\E[01;32m'


    15
    echo "export LESS_TERMCAP_mb=$'\E[01;31m'" >> ~/.bashrc
    totti · 2011-10-20 17:34:14 1
  • This will affect all invocations of grep, even when it is called from inside a script.


    1
    export GREP_OPTIONS='--color=auto'
    h3xx · 2011-07-24 01:32:10 0
  • in case you run some command in CLI and would like to take read strerr little bit better, you can use the following command. It's also possible to grep it if necessary....


    19
    mycommand 2> >(while read line; do echo -e "\e[01;31m$line\e[0m"; done)
    confiq · 2010-12-30 21:42:42 10
  • This is super fast and an easy way to test your terminal for 256 color support. Unlike alot of info about changing colors in the terminal, this uses the ncurses termcap/terminfo database to determine the escape codes used to generate the colors for a specific TERM. That means you can switch your terminal and then run this to check the real output. tset xterm-256color at any rate that is some super lean code! Here it is in function form to stick in your .bash_profile aa_256 () { ( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`; for i in {0..256}; do o=00$i; echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x; done ) } From my bash_profile: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    7
    ( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`;for i in {0..256};do o=00$i;echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x;done; )
    AskApache · 2010-09-06 10:39:27 2
  • I like the other three versions but one uses nested loops and another prints every color on a separate line. Both versions fail to reset colors before giving the prompt back. This version uses the column command to print a table so all the colors fit on one screen. It also resets colors back to normal before as a last step.


    9
    for i in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${i}m${i}"; done | column -c 80 -s ' '; echo -e "\e[m"
    cout · 2010-07-21 17:30:36 1
  • Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash. This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.


    45
    for code in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${code}m $code: Test"; done
    scribe · 2010-06-19 02:14:42 4
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