Commands tagged mv (36)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Rebuild a Delimited File with a Unique Delimiter
Useful for CSV files. In the command, the file in question is comma delimited but contains double quoted fields containing commas and contains no @ symbols (as confirmed with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/9998/delimiter-hunting). This command converts the delimiting commas to @s while preserving the commas in the fields using the "uniqueString" to mark the ends of lines.

Print a row of characters across the terminal
Print a row of characters across the terminal. Uses tput to establish the current terminal width, and generates a line of characters just long enough to cross it. In the example '#' is used. It's possible to use a repeating sequence by dividing the columns by the number of characters in the sequence like this: $ seq -s'~-' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /2 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' or $ seq -s'-~?' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /3 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]' You will lose chararacters at the end if the length isn't cleanly divisible.

Check if system is 32bit or 64bit
Needed a quick way to see if my server distro that I setup years ago was running 32bit or not, since with time I had forgotten. Note: does not check _hardware_ e.g. /proc/cpuinfo but rather the kernel installed

Restrict the bandwidth for the SCP command
the command is obvious, I know, but maybe not everyone knows that using the parameter "-l" you can limit the use of bandwidth command scp. In this example fetch all files from the directory zutaniddu and I copy them locally using only 10 Kbs

Force hard reset on server
Useful when you have some wrong on a server (nfs freeze/ immortal process)

Find the package that installed a command

route output as next command's parameters

Get IPv4 of eth0 for use with scripts
I've been using it in a script to build from scratch proxy servers.


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