Commands tagged integer (4)

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Display Dilbert strip of the day
Requires display. Corrected version thanks to sputnick and eightmillion user.

Disable beep sound from your computer
This command will disable the beep sound from the PC speaker.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Download 10 random wallpapers from images.google.com

Carriage return for reprinting on the same line
The above code is just an example of printing on the same line, hit Ctrl + C to stop When using echo -ne "something\r", echo will: - print "something" - dont print a new line (-n) - interpret \r as carriage return, going back to the start of the line (-e) Remember to print some white spaces after the output if your command will print lines of different sizes, mainly if one line will be smaller than the previous Edit from reading comments: You can achieve the same effect using printf (more standardized than echo): while true; do printf "%-80s\r" "$(date)"; sleep 1; done

sniff network traffic on a given interface and displays the IP addresses of the machines communicating with the current host (one IP per line)

Unlock more space form your hard drive
This command changes the reserved space for privileged process on '/dev/sda' to 1 per cent.

Print just line 4 from a textfile
Prints the 4th line and then quits. (Credit goes to flatcap in comments: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/6031/print-just-line-4-from-a-textfile#comment.)

List all files/folders in working directory with their total size in Megabytes

List all authors of a particular git project
Gets the authors, sorts by number of commits (as a vague way of estimating how much of the project is their work, i.e. the higher in the list, the more they've done) and then outputs the results.


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