Commands tagged esx (4)

  • To monitor .vmdk files during snapshot deletion (commit) on ESX only (ESXi doesn't have the watch command): 1. Navigate to the VM directory containing .vmdk files. # watch "ls -tough --full-time *.vmdk" where: -t sorts by modification time -o do not list group information (to narrow the output) -u sorts by access time -g only here for the purpose to easily remember the created mnemonic word 'tough' -h prints sizes in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M 2G) --full-time sets the time style to full-iso and does not list user information (to narrow the output) optionally useful parameters to the watch command: -d highlight changes between updates -n seconds to wait between updates (default is 2) -t turn off printing the header


    1
    watch 'ls -tough --full-time *.vmdk'
    vRobM · 2010-08-20 17:28:28 0

  • 0
    esxcli network ip interface ipv4 set -i vmk1 -I 10.27.51.143 -N 255.255.255.0 -t static
    PROJAK_SX · 2014-03-01 20:05:08 0
  • Replace VM directory and file prefix with new prefix Once the the file names are updated the config files will need to be updated using command similar to the following: sed -i -- 's/original_/new_/g' *.vmx sed -i -- 's/original_/new_/g' *.vmxf sed -i -- 's/original_/new_/g' *.file.vmdk sed -i -- 's/original_/new_/g' *_file_1.vmdk


    0
    for f in $(find . -name 'original_*'); do mv $f ${f/original_/new_}; done;
    rbocchinfuso · 2015-05-22 19:56:26 0
  • This command will shutdown all VMs on an VMWare ESX host. First it tries to gracefully shutdown the VM. If that fails it will hard shutdown and the power off.


    -1
    for vm in `/usr/bin/vmware-cmd -l`; do /usr/bin/vmware-cmd "${vm}" stop trysoft; done
    maxheadroom · 2011-09-15 06:56:49 0

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Find the process you are looking for minus the grepped one
faster ;) but your idea is really cool

extracts 64 bytes of random digits from random lines out of /dev/random sent to stdio
Use this the next time you need to come up with a reasonably random bitstring, like for a WPA/WPA2 PSK or something. Takes a continuous stream of bytes coming from /dev/urandom, runs it through od(1), picking a random field ($0 and $1 excluded) from a random line and then prints it.

Randomize lines in a file
shuf is in the coreutils package

list files recursively by size

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

duration of the DNS-query

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Print just line 4 from a textfile
Prints the 4th line and then quits. (Credit goes to flatcap in comments: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/6031/print-just-line-4-from-a-textfile#comment.)

Stripping ^M at end of each line for files
That "^M" is Ctrl-M, which is a carriage return, and is not needed in Unix file systems. Where ^V is actually Ctrl-V and ^M is actually Ctrl-M (you must type these yourself, don't just copy and paste this command). ^V will not be displayed on your screen.

Buffer in order to avoir mistakes with redirections that empty your files
A common mistake in Bash is to write command-line where there's command a reading a file and whose result is redirected to that file. It can be easily avoided because of : 1) warnings "-bash: file.txt: cannot overwrite existing file" 2) options (often "-i") that let the command directly modify the file but I like to have that small function that does the trick by waiting for the first command to end before trying to write into the file. Lots of things could probably done in a better way, if you know one...


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