Commands tagged m3u (4)

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Empty a file
The downside of output redirection is that you need permissions. So something like $ > file won't play nicely w/ sudo. You'd need to do something like $ bash -c '> file' instead, you could go w/ $ sudo truncate -s0 file

Mortality Countdown
watch the seconds of your life tick away - replace YYYY-mm-dd HH:MM:ss w/ your birthtime.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Dump dvd from a different machine onto this one.
You can use this to directly dump from machine A (with dvd drive) to machine B (without dvd drive) . I used this to copy dvd using my friend's machine to my netbook. Above command is to be issued on machine B. Advantages : 1) No wasting time dumping first to machine A and then copying to Machine B. 2) You dont need to use space on Machine A. In fact, this will work even when Machine A doesnt have enough hdd space to dump the DVD. Use -C ssh option on slow networks (enables compression). you can replace "dd if=/dev/dvd" with any ripping command as long as it spews the iso to stdout.

Use vim automation to create a colorized html file

Get Cookies from bash
The loop is to compare cookies. You can remove it... Maybe you wanna use curl... $ curl www.commandlinefu.com/index.php -s0 -I | grep "Set-Cookie"

Check which files are opened by Firefox then sort by largest size.
Check which files are opened by Firefox then sort by largest size (in MB). You can see all files opened by just replacing grep to "/". Useful if you'd like to debug and check which extensions or files are taking too much memory resources in Firefox.

Rename many files in directories and subdirectories
This is probably overkill, but I have some issues when the directories have spaces in their names. The $ find . -type d -print0 | while read -d $'\0' dir; do xxx; done loops over all the subdirectories in this place, ignoring the white spaces (to some extend). $ cd "$dir"; echo " process $dir"; cd -; goes to the directory and back. It also prints some info to check the progress. $ find . -maxdepth 1 -name "*.ogg.mp3" -exec rename 's/.ogg.mp3/.mp3/' {} \; renames the file within the current directory. The whole should work with directories and file names that include white spaces.

Retrieve top ip threats from http://isc.sans.org/sources.html and add them into iptables output chain.
Retrieve top ip threats from http://isc.sans.org/sources.html and add them into iptables output chain.

Sort output by column
(separator = $IFS)


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