Commands tagged xargs (141)

  • Similar to xargs -i, but works with builtin bash commands (rather than running "bash -c ..." through xargs)


    3
    xargsb() { while read -r cmd; do ${@//'{}'/$cmd}; done; }
    BobbyTables · 2010-09-28 06:35:39 3

  • 3
    tail -f file |xargs -IX printf "$(date -u)\t%s\n" X
    unefunge · 2010-11-25 11:23:13 1

  • 3
    bargs { while read i; do "[email protected]" "$i"; done }
    wytten · 2011-01-06 19:25:43 1
  • rename file name with fixed length nomeric format pattern Show Sample Output


    3
    ls *.jpg | awk -F'.' '{ printf "%s %04d.%s\n", $0, $1, $2; }' | xargs -n2 mv
    hute37 · 2011-05-01 13:32:58 2
  • The difference between the original version provided and this one is that this one works rather than outputting a wget error


    3
    curl $1 | grep -E "http.*\.mp3" | sed "s/.*\(http.*\.mp3\).*/\1/" | xargs wget
    theodric · 2015-09-17 13:19:53 1
  • Based on the MrMerry one, just add some visuals and sort directory and files


    2
    find . -maxdepth 1 -type d|xargs du -a --max-depth=0|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '1d'|while read i;do echo "$(du -h --max-depth=0 "$i")/";done;find . -maxdepth 1 -type f|xargs du -a|sort -rn|cut -d/ -f2|sed '$d'|while read i;do du -h "$i";done
    nickwe · 2009-09-03 20:33:21 1
  • Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsmod | cut -d' ' -f1 | xargs modinfo | egrep '^file|^desc|^dep' | sed -e'/^dep/s/$/\n/g'
    mohan43u · 2009-11-17 02:13:34 0

  • 2
    killall -9 rouge-process
    pepin · 2010-05-09 22:41:22 1
  • Works with files containing spaces and for very large directories.


    2
    find -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %y\ %n | sort
    dooblem · 2010-05-29 13:40:18 0
  • I like this better than some of the alternatives using -exec, because if I want to change the string, it's right there at the end of the command line. That means less editing effort and more time to drink coffee. Show Sample Output


    2
    find . -name '*.?pp' | xargs grep -H "string"
    cout · 2010-07-14 14:41:07 0
  • for when a program is hogging the sound output. finds, and kills. add -9 to the end for wedged processes. add in 'grep ^program' after lsof to filter. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsof /dev/snd/pcm*p /dev/dsp | awk ' { print $2 }' | xargs kill
    alustenberg · 2010-07-23 20:24:16 1
  • unset PROMPT_COMMAND to disable. Show Sample Output


    2
    PROMPT_COMMAND='seq $COLUMNS | xargs -IX printf "%Xs\r" @'
    unefunge · 2010-11-24 14:34:21 6
  • If you want to pull all of the files from a tree that has mixed files and directories containing files, this will link them all into a single directory. Beware of filesystem files-per-directory limits.


    2
    find /deep/tree/ -type f -print0|xargs -0 -n1 -I{} ln -s '{}' .
    dinomite · 2010-12-21 13:00:33 0
  • For instance: find . -type f -name '*.wav' -print0 |xargs -0 -P 3 -n 1 flac -V8 will encode all .wav files into FLAC in parallel. Explanation of xargs flags: -P [max-procs]: Max number of invocations to run at once. Set to 0 to run all at once [potentially dangerous re: excessive RAM usage]. -n [max-args]: Max number of arguments from the list to send to each invocation. -0: Stdin is a null-terminated list. I use xargs to build parallel-processing frameworks into my scripts like the one here: http://pastebin.com/1GvcifYa


    2
    xargs -P 3 -n 1 <COMMAND> < <FILE_LIST>
    h3xx · 2011-07-25 22:53:32 1
  • Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
    h3xx · 2011-08-15 03:10:58 0
  • Can be used for other commands as well, replace rm with ls. It is easy to make this shorter but if the filenames involved have spaces, you will need to do use find's "-print0" option in conjunction with xargs's "-0" option. Otherwise the shell that xargs uses to execute the "rm" command line will treat the space as a token separator, thereby treating the name as two (or more) names. Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -name 'junkfiles-*' -print0 | xargs -0 rm
    kancer · 2009-03-26 15:38:42 2
  • By time thumbnail images in ~/thumbnails take up too much space, this command will help deleting old ones. Find options explained: -type f : find files only, not directories -atime +30 : last accessed more than 30 days ago


    1
    find ~/.thumbnails/ -type f -atime +30 -print0 | xargs -0 rm
    alperyilmaz · 2009-03-30 04:23:07 5
  • Lists the local files that are not present in the remote repository (lines beginning with ?) and add them. Show Sample Output


    1
    svn status | grep '^?' | awk '{ print $2; }' | xargs svn add
    unixmonkey4200 · 2009-04-10 21:55:37 2
  • In the example, uid 0 is root. foo:foo are the user:group you want to make owner and group. '.' is the "current directory and below." -print0 and -0 indicate that filenames and directories "are terminated by a null character instead of by whitespace."


    1
    find . -uid 0 -print0 | xargs -0 chown foo:foo
    abcde · 2009-05-27 19:52:13 1
  • use the locate command to find files on the system and verify they exist (-e) then display each one in full details. Show Sample Output


    1
    locate -e somefile | xargs ls -l
    nadavkav · 2009-08-23 13:16:59 0
  • A little bit smaller, faster and should handle files with special characters in the name.


    1
    find . -maxdepth 1 ! -name '.' -execdir du -0 -s {} + | sort -znr | gawk 'BEGIN{ORS=RS="\0";} {sub($1 "\t", ""); print $0;}' | xargs -0 du -hs
    ashawley · 2009-09-11 16:07:39 2
  • Liked command 4077 so I improved it, by doing all text manipulation with sed. "Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules." THX mohan43u Show Sample Output


    1
    lsmod | sed -e '1d' -e 's/\(\([^ ]*\) \)\{1\}.*/\2/' | xargs modinfo | sed -e '/^dep/s/$/\n/g' -e '/^file/b' -e '/^desc/b' -e '/^dep/b' -e d
    marssi · 2009-11-17 22:51:08 0
  • There is a limit to how many processes you can run at the same time for each user, especially with web hosts. If the maximum # of processes for your user is 200, then the following sets OPTIMUM_P to 100. OPTIMUM_P=$(( (`ulimit -u` - `find /proc -maxdepth 1 \( -user $USER -o -group $GROUPNAME \) -type d|wc -l`) / 2 )) This is very useful in scripts because this is such a fast low-resource-intensive (compared to ps, who, lsof, etc) way to determine how many processes are currently running for whichever user. The number of currently running processes is subtracted from the high limit setup for the account (see limits.conf, pam, initscript). An easy to understand example- this searches the current directory for shell scripts, and runs up to 100 'file' commands at the same time, greatly speeding up the command. find . -type f | xargs -P $OPTIMUM_P -iFNAME file FNAME | sed -n '/shell script text/p' I am using it in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html especially for the xargs command. Xargs has a -P option that lets you specify how many processes to run at the same time. For instance if you have 1000 urls in a text file and wanted to download all of them fast with curl, you could download 100 at a time (check ps output on a separate [pt]ty for proof) like this: cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}' I like to do things as fast as possible on my servers. I have several types of servers and hosting environments, some with very restrictive jail shells with 20processes limit, some with 200, some with 8000, so for the jailed shells my xargs -P10 would kill my shell or dump core. Using the above I can set the -P value dynamically, so xargs always works, like this. cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}' If you were building a process-killer (very common for cheap hosting) this would also be handy. Note that if you are only allowed 20 or so processes, you should just use -P1 with xargs. Show Sample Output


    1
    echo $(( `ulimit -u` - `find /proc -maxdepth 1 \( -user $USER -o -group $GROUPNAME \) -type d|wc -l` ))
    AskApache · 2010-03-12 08:42:49 1
  • Finds all C++, Python, SWIG files in your present directory (uses "*" rather than "." to exclude invisibles) and counts how many lines are in them. Returns only the last line (the total). Show Sample Output


    1
    find * \( -name "*.[hc]pp" -or -name "*.py" -or -name "*.i" \) -print0 | xargs -0 wc -l | tail -n 1
    neologism · 2010-03-25 18:58:29 1

  • 1
    find . -name '*.?pp' -exec grep -H "string" {} \;
    rthemocap · 2010-07-14 15:10:23 2
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Print just line 4 from a textfile
this method should be the fastest

Uniquely (sort of) color text so you can see changes
Colorify colors input by converting the text to a number and then performing modulo 7 on it. This resulting number is used as the color escape code. This can be used to color the results of commands with complex outputs (like "482279054165371") so if any of the digits change, there's a good chance the color will change too. I say good chance because there's only 7 unique colors here, so assuming you were watching random numbers, there would be a 6/7 chance that the color would change when the number changed. This should really only be used to help quickly identify when things change, but should not be the only thing relied upon to positively assert that an output has not changed.

remove all spaces from all files in current folder

Rename files in batch

list files recursively by size

View internet connection activity in a browser
In addition to generating the current connections, it also opens then in your default browser on gnome.

Removes file with a dash in the beginning of the name

cleanup /tmp directory
Cleans all files in /tmp that have been accessed at least 2 days ago.

Watch the progress of 'dd'
This version was mentioned in the comments. Credits go to flatcap.

Read random news on the internet
sort -R randomize the list. head -n1 takes the first.


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