Commands tagged wget (101)

  • Yep, now you can finally google from the command line! Here's a readable version "for your pleasure"(c): google() { # search the web using google from the commandline # syntax: google google query=$(echo "$*" | sed "s:%:%25:g;s:&:%26:g;s:+:%2b:g;s:;:%3b:g;s: :+:g") data=$(wget -qO - "https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=$query") title=$(echo "$data" | tr '}' '\n' | sed "s/.*,\"titleNoFormatting//;s/\":\"//;s/\",.*//;s/\\u0026/'/g;s/\\\//g;s/#39\;//g;s/'amp;/\&/g" | head -1) url="$(echo "$data" | tr '}' '\n' | sed 's/.*"url":"//;s/".*//' | head -1)" echo "${title}: ${url} | http://www.google.com/search?q=${query}" } Enjoy :) Show Sample Output


    -7
    The command is too big to fit here. :( Look at the description for the command, in readable form! :)
    hunterm · 2011-01-05 02:45:28 1
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