Commands tagged citrix (3)

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recurisvely md5 all files in a tree
Found this little gem here: http://info.michael-simons.eu/2008/10/25/recursively-md5sum-all-files-in-a-directory-tree/

Check if x509 certificate file and rsa private key match
A x509 certificate and a rsa key file have in common a parameter called modulus, it is a very long hexadecimal number. That value is unique for each certficate / key pair. The command allows to do the check of this pair of values in a script using a great feature of bash. "

Replace the content of an XML element
Replaces "650" with "999" in simple.xml. xml used - http://www.w3schools.com/xml/simple.xml

Deal with dot files safely

Factory reset your android device via commandline.

Exclude svn directories with grep
exclude-dir option requires grep 2.5.3

convert (almost) any image into a video
This is an extract from a larger script which makes up slideshow videos from images. $seconds is the number of seconds the video will last, and $num is a loop counter which numbers the videos for concat into a longer video later, so they will be in order. The dev/null bit on the end cuts ffmpeg's verbosity.

(Debian/Ubuntu) Discover what package a file belongs to
'dpkg -S' just matches the string you supply it, so just using 'ls' as an argument matches any file from any package that has 'ls' anywhere in the filename. So usually it's a good idea to use an absolute path. You can see in the second example that 12 thousand files that are known to dpkg match the bare string 'ls'.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get the time since epoch
Get the time since epoch. Useful when working with commands and logs which use this format.


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