Commands tagged archlinux (10)

  • This one-liner will output installed packages sorted by size in Kilobytes. Show Sample Output


    4
    paste <(pacman -Q | awk '{ print $1; }' | xargs pacman -Qi | grep 'Size' | awk '{ print $4$5; }') <(pacman -Q | awk '{print $1; }') | sort -n | column -t
    BruceLEET · 2011-01-07 18:43:18 0
  • -Qdt Lists dependencies/packages which are no longer required by any packages -q Output only package name (not the version number) -R Remove package(s) Rest is self-explanatory. I just started out with Arch - so if there is any better/standard method to achieve the same - please suggest.


    4
    pacman -Qdt -q | xargs pacman --noconfirm -R
    b_t · 2014-02-27 05:17:57 0
  • uses the pkgfile command (part of the community repository), highly suggested.


    1
    pkgfile -lb `pkgfile <command>`
    infinull · 2010-10-01 04:54:49 1
  • Sometimes when I find a new cool command I want to know: 1.- which package owns it, and 2.- are there any other cool commands provided by this package? Since I don't necessarily need to know always both, I don't use this version, but I bundle it into two separate functions: # get command package owner # it can work without the full path, but sometimes fails, so better to provide it with whereis command owner () { pacman -Qo `whereis $1 | awk '{print $2}'` } whatelse () { package=`owner ${1} | sed -e 's/.*is owned by \([[:alpha:]]\+\).*/\1/'` pacman -Ql $package | grep 'bin' } Show Sample Output


    0
    w=`whereis <command> | awk '{print $2}'`; p=`pacman -Qo $w | sed -e 's/.*is owned by \([[:alpha:]]\+\).*/\1/'`; pacman -Ql $p | grep 'bin'
    conan · 2010-10-01 04:28:04 0

  • 0
    pacman -Qi $(pacman -Qq)|grep 'Name\|Size'| cut -d: -f2 | paste - - | column -t | sort -nk2
    minus · 2011-05-03 13:02:06 1
  • M is size in megabytes, man expac to see other sizes %m is install size %k is download size


    0
    expac -S -H M "%m %n"|sort -n
    gtmanfred · 2012-06-14 19:41:21 0
  • In this example I am returning all the files in /usr/bin that weren't put there by pacman, so that they can be moved to /usr/local/bin where they (most likely) belong. Show Sample Output


    0
    for file in /usr/bin/*; do pacman -Qo "$file" &> /dev/null || echo "$file"; done
    malathion · 2014-04-22 21:57:08 0
  • This version accounts for the MiB/KiB suffix output by pacman these days.


    0
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' 'BEGIN{ s["MiB"]=1024; s["KiB"]=1;} {split($3, a, " "); print a[1] * s[a[2]], "KiB", $1}' | sort -n
    Timo · 2018-04-24 13:29:57 0

  • 0
    echo -e "\n[sublime-text]\nServer = https://download.sublimetext.com/arch/dev/x86_64" | sudo tee -a /etc/pacman.conf
    HaoZeke · 2018-08-13 07:30:55 0
  • This, like the other commands listed here, displays installed arch packages. Unlike the other ones this also displays the short description so you can see what that package does without having to go to google. It also shows the largest packages on top. You can optionally pipe this through head to display an arbitrary number of the largest packages installed (e.g. ... | head -30 # for the largest 30 packages installed) Show Sample Output


    -1
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' '{ print $2, "\t", $1, "\t", $3 }' | sort -rn
    GetterNoCheddar · 2012-11-20 03:40:55 0

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