Commands tagged trim (5)

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Convert .flv to .avi

Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)
Scrap everything and use `gawk` to do all the magic, since it's like the future or something. $ gawk 'match($11, /[a-z]{3}$/) && match($9, /^ata-/) { gsub("../", ""); print $11,"\t",$9 }' Yank out only ata- lines that have a drive letter (ignore lines with partitions). Then strip ../../ and print the output. Yay awk. Be sure to see the alternatives as my initial command is listed there. This one is a revision of the original.

Printing multiple years with Unix cal command
print multiple increasing years using cal - calendar -. You can also try $seq Start Increment End

Watch contents of a file grow
In this case, I'm keeping an eye on /var/log/messages, but of course any file will do. When I'm following a file, I generally don't want to see anything other than what has been added due to the command or service I've executed. This keeps everything clean and tidy for troubleshooting.

Propagate a directory to another and create symlink to content
Lndir create from source directory to destination directory a full symlink tree of all contents of source directory, really useful for propagate changes from a directory to another.

A very simple and useful stopwatch
time read -sn1 (s:silent, n:number of characters. Press any character to stop)

relabel current konsole tab
usage: renam in a script you must replace $PPID with $(awk '{print $4}' /prod/$PPID/stat)

List all databases in Postgres and their (byte/human) sizes, ordering by byte size descending
Get a listing of all of your databases in Postgres and their sizes, ordering by the largest size first. Requires that you give the -d parameter a valid database name that you can connect to.

Find the package that installed a command

Encrypted archive with openssl and tar
command to decrypt: $ openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -d < secret.tar.enc | tar x Of course, don't forget to rm the original files ;) You may also want to look at the openssl docs for more options.


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