Commands tagged w3m (5)

  • Turns a PDF into HTML (without images) and prints it to the standard out which is picked up and interpreted by w3m.


    4
    pdftohtml -i -stdout FILE.pdf | w3m -T text/html
    Haegin · 2010-11-03 12:01:01 1
  • change the nfl in the url to mlb or nba to get those score/times as well Show Sample Output


    2
    w3m -no-cookie http://m.espn.go.com/nfl/scoreboard?|sed 's/ Final/ : Final/g'|sed 's/ F\// : F\//g'|sed 's/, / : /g'|grep -i ':'
    SQUIIDUX · 2010-11-15 01:18:19 3
  • Uses Google's "OneBox" to look up the sunrise in any city by name. If no city is specified, it defaults to Seattle. For the sunset time, you change the search query to "sunset", like so, . sunset() { city=${1-Seattle}; w3m "google.com/search?q=sunset:$city" | sed -r '1,/^\s*1\./d; /^\s*2\./,$d; /^$/d' ;} . "OneBox" is Google's term for that box that appears before the organic search results that has useful information that Google thinks you might be looking for (mathematical calculations, weather, currency conversions, and such). I'm not actually using OneBox correctly, but that's because I'm not sure that there is a "correctly". I looked for a command line API, but couldn't find one, so I settled on parsing stdout from the fantastic w3m web browser. I use the sed script to show only the first hit by deleting everything from the beginning of the file until it sees " 1." and then deleting everything from " 2." to the end of the file. Ugly and fragile, yes, but it works fine. . BUG1: w3m represents the picture of the sun rising, "weather_sunset-40.gif" as "[weat]" which is slightly confusing and probably should be removed. . BUG2: The output is more easily readable by a human, which means it's less useful for scripting. Show Sample Output


    0
    sunrise() { city=${1-Seattle}; w3m "google.com/search?q=sunrise:$city" | sed -r '1,/^\s*1\./d; /^\s*2\./,$d; /^$/d' ;}
    hackerb9 · 2010-11-02 21:24:23 1
  • Just feed classical duckduckgo request replacing the "!" for the bang by a "-" (ie. "ddg -gi mickey mouse") and the result will be opened in w3m (think of installing w3m-img for image support in xterm or tty) To put it in the .bashrc, remove the "\" that escapes the "!".


    0
    ddg(){ search=""; bang=""; for term in $@; do if [[ "$term" =~ -([A-Za-z0-9._%+-]*) ]]; then bang="\!${BASH_REMATCH[1]}" ; else search="$search%20$term" ; fi ; done ; w3m "https://www.duckduckgo.com/?q=$bang$search" ;}
    boustrophedon757 · 2013-10-30 21:41:36 0
  • You can put this at .bashrc or .profile and get a random tip every time you open a terminal Show Sample Output


    0
    w3m -dump http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/random/plaintext
    noobcodr · 2017-05-14 02:11:12 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

List only the directories

ls not pattern
Hides some entries from listing.

Show linux kernel modules dependencies
Use modprobe to list all the dependencies of a certain kernel module. Handy when debugging system issues.

Using ASCII Art output on MPlayer
Not so useful. Just a cool feature.

urldecoding
$ echo "http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com" | sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e http://www.google.com $ Works under bash on linux. just alter the '-e' option to its corresponding equivalence in your system to execute escape characters correctly.

Get the dir listing of an executable without knowing its location

Get all IPs via ifconfig
Fetches the IPs and ONLY the IPs from ifconfig. Simplest, shortest, cleanest. Perl is too good to be true... (P.S.: credit should go to Peteris Krumins at catonmat.net)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Check if x509 certificate file and rsa private key match
A x509 certificate and a rsa key file have in common a parameter called modulus, it is a very long hexadecimal number. That value is unique for each certficate / key pair. The command allows to do the check of this pair of values in a script using a great feature of bash. "


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: